Plessy V Ferguson Separate But Equal Case Study

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1) What are the reasons that “separate but equal” seemed to solve the problem of educational equality?

The decision made in Plessy v. Ferguson that established the doctrine of “separate but equal” truly did have the intention of creating educational equality for all people, no matter what race they happened to be. Before the doctrine was in place, schools were terribly unequal in favor of white children. Students of color were receiving a very poor education and did not receive the same opportunities to succeed as white students did. This was extremely unfair and detrimental to students of color’s lives, so the case was brought to court. Under this new established doctrine, schools would still be segregated based on the color of students’
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Ferguson did not actually succeed in creating educational equality. As stated in the previous response, the fundamental requirement for success in society requires an education be provided. Prior to the aforementioned court ruling, schools for African American students were in terrible condition (186, 14). Students who attended these schools were not able to receive same opportunities in life as white students, and the “separate but equal” doctrine aimed to solve it. Under this doctrine, schools were segregated still based on races, but had to be equal, especially in terms of quality and resources. Most of the time, the schools were indeed “tangibly” equal (182, 30-33). They had the teachers. The buildings were for the most part equal. However, the Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that the “separate but equal” doctrine did not actually provide equality for students of color. Why? Because the intangible aspects of the schools were not equal. The problem is that segregation creates a sense of inferiority for students who are not in the majority (183,25-26). The fact that they cannot be educated along their white peers inherently suggests that they are less valuable as learners and future members of society. Considering the horrific injustices, they had to deal with in the past, this inherent feeling and tone established by segregation makes complete sense. Further, a feeling of inferiority affects not only the sense of worth of the student, but also the students will or ability to take in educational opportunities. It takes away their motivation (183, 32). Even if students are given the resources they need to learn, such as teachers and textbooks, it does not necessarily mean that they will do equally well. If a student is not valued, they will not want to learn. If society does not treat them as equals, they will not want to become active members in it, which is what

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