Sense Of Self Analysis

Superior Essays
Social class, ethnicity and gender are some of the main influences that govern an individual’s perception of sense of self. The term sense of self means the kind of person an individual is. According to Oxford dictionaries (2014), the general term for self is an individual’s importance of being that distinguishes them from others and they are considered as the object of reflexive action. This means that sense of self is a perception of how and what an individual identifies themselves as and this may refer to different forms such as behaviour. For example an individual who sees them-self as an introvert believes that the behaviour is naturally within. This essay shall describe when and why social class remains important for people’s sense of self. Furthermore there shall be brief explanations of how ethnicity and gender also remain important for people’s sense of self. To illustrate when and why social class remains important to a person’s sense of self, this essay shall look at different concepts, theories and perspectives which include theories like, The Looking Glass Self theory by Charles Cooley (1902), theory of ‘I and Me’ by George Mead (1934) and concepts of identities. To begin the discussion, there shall be a brief explanation on relative theories and concepts using …show more content…
To clarify the idea, Cooley’s looking glass theory (1902) points out that a person’s self is derives from how they think other people see them which an individual learns through interaction (Lie and Brym, 2012). Moreover Cooley (1902) believes that the looking glass is in three stages; the first stage being the imagination of others’ views on an individual. This can be based on how people think others see them. The second stage is how an individual projects how they think people judge them and the third stage is how an individual reacts to what they think people perceives

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Lemert's Labeling Theory

    • 1148 Words
    • 5 Pages

    They begin to internalize that label and look at themselves differently. Burke tells the reader that, “Labeling theory stems from the symbolic interactionist tradition of the “looking- glass self”, or the reflexive self , which means that an individual will come to view the self in a way that reflects the views of others and thus come to act in a manner consistent with these views” (Sociological Perspectives 164). People feel like they are isolated and different. If they begin to see themselves as the label they have been given then it becomes extremely hard to get rid of the…

    • 1148 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Secondly, the self idea developed in relation to how we imagine others perceive or judge us. Lastly, the self idea emerges through the self feeling or attitude one develops toward themselves. This is based on how we believe other perceive us. The concept of the “looking glass” can be used to show the role of conflict and the role of strain. If were so worried in the way we think people think of us, it can bring conflict into the ways we achieve our roles in life.…

    • 725 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Social Identity Theory

    • 2375 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The outcome of social comparisons determine our social identity and self-esteem when compared to groups that are close to the groups we are in. There are three premises for social comparison (Tajfel & Turner, 1979, p. 41). The first one is that individuals must have internalized their group membership as a part of their self-concept, which means they must be identified with their in-group. Then the second one is that the situation must allow social comparison. Thirdly, they have to have an out-group which is relevant in terms of similarity and proximity to compare to (Hinkle & Brown,…

    • 2375 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Societies expectations are socially constructed depending on gender and sex leading society to be patterned, which can lead to consequences. Social construction of gender is socially constructed rules that people follow and live by. The social construction of gender approach is what seems to be the reality but, is really not real (Scott Coltrane 1988;1). The social construction of gender rules can…

    • 1027 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Privilege and oppression stems from the socially contracted categories that are used to identify who we are. Whether aware of it or not, most of us find our lives affected by both privilege and oppression. Further meaning, are lives are shaped by the oppression and privilege we experience. It affects who we are and how we interact with those around us. In order to decipher how you experience privilege and oppression, when it isn’t clear, it’s important to identify your socially constructed categories and how they either put you at an advantage or disadvantage.…

    • 1729 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Theories Of Self Concept

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages

    According to the American sociologist Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), the degree of personal insecurity you display in social situations is determined by what you believe other people think of you. people shape their self-concepts based on their understanding of how others perceive them. We form our self-image as the reflections of the response and evaluations of others in our environment. According to Cooley, this process has three steps. First, we imagine how we appear…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A theory of society which focuses on how people interact with one another and the role symbols play in those interactions. Symbolic interactionism explains the individual in society and there interaction with others and with that it can explain social order. Social order starts from the individuals and the meaning they give objects. What makes humans different from other species is that in our everyday interactions we give meaning to objects, activities, and people. According to symbolic interactionists argue that our sense of self comes directly from the evaluations of others and are behavior is shaped by the opinions we get from others.…

    • 492 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Great Essays

    Cooley came out with the theory of “looking-glass self” while Mead proposed a theory of role-play and imitation (Andersen & Taylor, 2007). Cooley explained how a person’s perception of self is driven by the relationship to others. The development of looking-glass self derived from (1) how we perceive ourselves appear to others; (2) how we perceive others judge us (3) the feelings that resulted from these thoughts. Cooley’s looking-glass self theory involves perception and its effects. The perception of how others view us and the effects of their judgment on us.…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Self Concept Communication

    • 1231 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Topic: Self-Concept in Communication Self-concept is a set of relatively stable perceptions that each of us holds about ourselves and the responses of others. It is our conception of what is unique about us and what makes us similar and different from others. In other words, self-concept is a mental mirror that reflects how we view ourselves in terms of physical, emotional state, talents, values, roles and the likes and dislikes. The way we think about ourself affects the way we express to people, in result it affects the way people react and treat us. The most significant part of one person’s self-concept might consist of social roles.…

    • 1231 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cultural appropriation is examined for the different characteristics of culture. Intersectionality Intersectionality is the analytical tool that helps understand and respond in a way that implies how the social identity of each person and status intersect, and contribute to the unique experiences of oppression and privilege. Intersectionality in practice helps to look beyond simplistic the concept of identity such as "working class" or "originality", that helps to…

    • 828 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays