Seminole Influence In Florida

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INTRODUCTION
Since before the British occupation of Florida (1763-1783), continuing throughout the second Spanish occupation (1783-1821), and unto the American occupation (1821), Creeks and many other southeastern Indian tribes, driven out of their homelands including escaping wars and colonial expansion, migrated to Florida. Although many other Indian tribes previously inhabited the peninsula, European diseases and wars devastated Florida’s Native population. Those few who survived: Timucua, Apalachee, Oconee, and Yuchi, among others, for the most part, assimilated with the more recent arrivals. Migration and the passage of time contributed to the spread of Muscogee language dialectal influences throughout Florida.
The use of the term Seminole
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Such terms were used to describe any of the various Indians immediately south or east of the Creek Nation (colonial Georgia and Florida) and included: “Seminolies” (or East Florida Creeks or “Alachuan” Seminoles), and members identified “Seminolian” or “Seminolean.” There would be attempts to identify some as “Mikasuki” (or Georgia) Seminoles to differentiate from Seminoles residing in Florida. The Hitchiti Indians who originated from the east side of Chattahoochee River region, spoke a Muscogee language that identified Florida Indians as the …show more content…
The former colonial occupiers and the United States for the sake of their own political convenience negotiated collectively with many Florida Indians blurring tribal affiliations, first as Creeks, then as Seminoles. Eventually, these constructed nations would help expedite their removal to the Indian Territory, while helping others reunite later. By 1826, the term “Seminole,” as an ethnic identity, which represented many separate tribes in Florida, now led to official recognition of the Seminole Nation and hopes of separating from Creek

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