Selfishness And Selfishness In Shakespeare's Macbeth

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Would you left your ambition to reach your goal bring danger upon yourself? Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are both selfish, but they show it in different ways and suffer in different ways. Lady Macbeth is singled-minded while Macbeth originally has scruples. They both only murder King Duncan for their own growth in society.This in the end gave them no satisfaction and made them both go crazy. In Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth he proves that selfishness is dangerous using imagery conflict and foreshadowing. William Shakespeare, who was born and passed away on the same day, is one of the greatest English writers in human history. He was born April 23rd 1564 and passed away April 23rd 1616 at the age of 52. Except they do not know much about Shakespeare …show more content…
Before Macbeth’s time to murder King Duncan he is already second guessing his choices. Macbeth wants to murder King Duncan, but then is having second thoughts about his actions as the time grows nearer. Macbeth wants to follow through with the murder, so he can achieve his goal of becoming king. He also does not want to follow through with the murder to keep his hands blood free and live a happy prosperous life. For example he states some reasons why he should kill the king, “If it were done quickly when tis done, then’ twere well it were done quickly” , he also states reasons why he should not kill the king” “Macbeth says that "tears shall drown the wind”. He states this because he knows that Duncan has been an excellent king, and the people love him. Throughout the novel men vs. fate plays a role in self ambition being dangerous. At the beginning of the play the weird sisters tell Macbeth that he will soon become king, but he shall not bear any children that become king. "All hail, Macbeth! hail to thee, …show more content…
When they finally meet in a duel he finds out that Macduff was not born from a woman "from his mother 's womb untimely ripped." This means that Macduff was removed from his mother 's womb via a cesarean section, and was not technically "born of a woman” The horses destroying one another foreshadowed Duncan 's death for the characters in the play. It is only after the fact that the characters can see the events as foreshadowing, however. As the audience, the foreshadowing is much more

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