Managing Beauty-Products And People: How Do People Define Beauty?

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Another useful source is “Managing Beauty - Products and People,” located in the Journal of Product & Brand Management. This article will help me fully understand the theoretical meanings behind defining beauty. It’s purpose is to look beneath the surface of how people define beauty, and explore all dimensions of it, and how advertisers adjust to this. They utilize a qualitative research method by conducting in depth interviews and a quantitative research technique by utilising factor analysis to produce a scale that measures beauty. Their results find that beauty is more than skin-deep. “Physical attractiveness may be the initial criterion on which people evaluate beauty but the evidence indicates that values, habits, personality, and behavior …show more content…
These theories help analyze these ads by giving the perception of the audience and why these ads are able to affect women’s self-image. Social comparison theory, one of the theories I will be utilizing, states that we decide our own personal and social worth by how we compare to others. Therefore, we continuously judge ourselves and make other evaluations over various areas, such as attractiveness and success (Social Comparison Theory, n.d.). Looking-Glass Self is an additional theory I will employ. It describes that viewers see themselves through the eyes of others, meaning a self-image forms by imagining what others may think of their appearance or behavior (Rousseau, 2002). Also, I will implement self-concept. This refers to “the individual’s belief about himself or herself, including the person’s attributes and who and what the self is” (McLeod, 2008). This general term applies to how one perceives and evaluates themselves (McLeod, 2008). Social identity is a person’s impression of who they are in relation to the groups they belong ( social class, family, sports team, etc.) to which provide pride and self-esteem (McLeod, 2008). The final theory I will study is the Self-Objectification Theory. The book Self-Objectification in Women: Causes, Consequences, and Counteractions describes the Self-Objectification hypothesis as, “Modern industrialized society chronically and pervasively objectifies the female body, and many women have come to view themselves through the lens of an external observer, habitually monitoring their own appearance, whether in public or private settings,” (Calogero, Tantleff-Dunn, & Thompson, 2011). The negative effects that correlate with self-objectification include, but are not limited to, body shame, depression, eating disorder, and anxiety about appearance (Calogero, Tantleff-Dunn, & Thompson, 2011). These ads will

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