Segregation In America

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Segregation in the United States began hundreds of years ago which eventually developed discrimination towards them. Discrimination has been and still an issue today and because of that, there are multiple laws and cases protecting all races in the United States. Segregation started as early as after the Civil War. The victory of the Union slowly improved the treatment of African American citizens. However, there are also laws approved later on to restrict their freedom unequally from the whites like the Jim Crow Laws and the Plessy v. Ferguson case. Many activists and protesters have fought to repeal them for better treatment and racial equality. Some were successful though some were not. Also, the end of World War II was the start of a new …show more content…
It means that blacks are segregated in all public facilities such as public bathrooms, schools, transportations, restaurants and drinking fountains, “In the South, segregation became the law of the land, a status quo that was upheld in 1896 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that "separate but equal" facilities for blacks and whites were constitutional” (GWU). This shows that African Americans still have equal rights as the whites but they are separated in certain places. There were also other rules that made that made black citizens difficult for them to vote, disenfranchising them. As the Jim Crow law had been successful in dividing them, most African Americans remained in poverty and working little labor with low …show more content…
Johnson and Al Lingo and several other black and white protesters planned to jump in the “whites only” swimming pool in St. Augustine, Florida at the Monson Motor Lodge. As they did, the owner of the hotel tried to force them to leave by pouring acid in the pool, “I knew that there was too much water for that acid to do anything. Also knew we wasn’t gonna be in there long, that someone was gonna drag us out of there” (Johnson). Johnson and the others knew that what they had done was illegal and the people around them would call the police. The protesters did not leave until the police came to drag them out and put them in jail. Their revolt gave attention to the media which led to President Johnson informing everyone about the incident, “Our whole foreign policy and everything else could go to hell over this. Yesterday in the swimming pool in St. Augustine they started pouring acid in the pool”. Due to the fact that whites would intentionally hurt African Americans just to achieve what they want is life threatening to all Blacks. This means that something must be done to protect the rights of their race in order to feel safe living in the United States. President Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act of

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