Second Great Awakening Dbq Analysis

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Many reform movements dealing with women’s’ rights, slavery and the penitentiary system were established in the United States in order to expand democratic ideals. The Second Great Awakening was occurring during this time and was the reason for these movements. The Second Great Awakening was led by leaders who encouraged changes in American society through the unity of the American people (Document B).
The women’s suffrage movement supported democratic ideals because it was a movement that fought for the equality of women. This movement fought for the right for women to vote. Women were encouraged to fight for their own democratic ideals. Many famous suffragists fought for women rights and equality. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, creation of democratic rights for women (Document I).
The abolitionism of slavery was being introduced and it supported democratic ideals because it created equality among
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Slaves, women and criminals were able to voice their complaints, which was god for the society (Document F). Society began to demand equality for the minority groups in America. On the other hand, many actions occurred that did not support democratic ideals. Such as, not everyone agreed with the changes in society, many said that society is good as it is now even though it was divided. (Document G) Also, immigration was looked upon as a threat and a danger to the democracy. (Document D) Consuming alcohol was also a threat to society and can make men do reckless actions. The cartoon of 1846 shows that drinking can lead to death. (Document H) Although there were many actions that did not support the ideals of a perfect democracy, there were movements that changed the society greatly. These movements include the abolitionism of slavery, the women’s rights suffrage and the changes made to the penitentiary system. All these reform movements helped create a better democracy in the years

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