Scout's Character Development: To Kill A Mockingbird

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Scout’s character has developed immensely in the second section. For instance, when she almost fights Cecil, she does not. She learns to think before she acts: “I drew a bead on him, remembered what Atticus said, then dropped my fists and walked away, ‘Scout’s a coward!’ ringing in my ears. It was the first time I walked away from a fight.” (pg. 81). However, she only does this in public for her father’s sake. At The Landing, she fought Francis, but it took Scout a long time to finally fight him, and this was because he called Atticus a ‘n*gger lover’. Scout thought it was an insult until she learns from Atticus, “it’s never an insult to be called what someone thinks is a bad name”. This teaches Scout that people can call her all the bad names …show more content…
In chapter ten, she had been feeling ashamed of Atticus’ age and job. She was ashamed that Atticus was older than most fathers, making him unable to play sports with the kids, or during the town football game. She was also embarrassed about her father’s job. Where most fathers had a drugstore job or a field job, Atticus worked in an office. However when the mad dog came, and Atticus shot it, she learned that Atticus was the best shot in all of Maycomb. Even though she wants to boast around school about it to prove her father was not ‘boring’, Jem tells her not to, explaining that if Atticus wanted his kids to know, he would have told them. Scout learns to listen to Jem, and understand that she does not need to be proud of her father for his talents, but his values. Another thing about Scout that has changed is her back talk. In the beginning, when Walter Cunningham was over for lunch, Scout spoke up about his eating habits. Calpurnia tells her that it does not matter who they are, a guest in the house deserves to be treated with utmost respect. She applies this lesson taught by Cal, when Auntie Alexandra is visiting for the …show more content…
In the first section, Jem was kind to Scout, and played fair as much as he could. As he gets older in the second section, he isolates himself from Scout and starts to act demanding and controlling. This is due to puberty. Along with his ‘appalling appetite’ according to Scout, he has also matured. For example, in chapter twelve, Scout and Jem find a comic about Atticus. The comic strip shows Atticus being chained to a desk, working hard, while pretty women are standing outside the window. While it looks an insult, Jem shows Scout it is a compliment, saying, “He spends his time doin’ things that wouldn’t get done if nobody did ‘em.”(pg. 132). This shows that Jem, due puberty and Boo Radley, has developed wisdom. He is beginning to think more like an adult, seeing things that he did not when he was younger. He is not a little boy anymore, shielded by his innocence. This changed when the fire occurred, and Jem blurted out everything about Dill, Jem, and Scout’s ventures with Boo Radley to Atticus. He felt guilty for being so bothersome to Boo when he only did good things for the kids. This relates to the theme and quote, “Shoot all the bluejays you want… but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (pg. 103), because Boo is a symbol for the mockingbird. As Miss Maudie explained, mockingbirds only make sweet music for people, and never do any harm to them, therefore making it a sin to kill a mockingbird. Boo gave treats for the

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