Science And Morality In Frankenstein And Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Superior Essays
Amongst the flickering glow from the candle light Mary Shelley had been writing all evening long. As the darkness of the night surrounded her, the light of her imagination lit up the room. Her creativity being tattooed into the indents of the paper, taking from her nethermost horrors and ideas and converting them into words. Letter by letter scribbling away quickly a warped tale of a mad scientist placing life into a creature he made piece by piece, and the lives they conducted. Frankenstein also known as The Modern Prometheus, a novel written by Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley in 1818, was a narrative comprised of incidents and sentiments from her own life. Mary wrote Frankenstein around the time of giving birth to her son. Much later …show more content…
Whereas the 1994 production of Frankenstein stays true to majority of the novel’s storyline and critical themes, of the similarity between the creature and Victor Frankenstein; and science and ethics. It differs from the novel in the representation of women; horror and terror; and the creature’s death.
The relationship between in both the movie and the books is that Frankenstein and the creature is the creature is submissive to his creator, who is the only man with enough knowledge to create another of his kind, while, Frankenstein is also submissive to his creation because it is physically stronger than him and is able to murder the ones he loves without much effort. They both try to play God, Victor by creating the creature and the creature for killing his family members and loved ones. At first glance it may seem that Victor Frankenstein and his creature are very different, but, in the movie and the book it shows that they are not so different at all. When Victor is in the process of creating his creature he is excited about the possibility of creating life. However, once he brings him to life he is filled with disgust at the monstrosity he created and says, “For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had
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The controversy is that with the advancement of science that Victor discovers, is he playing God? In both the movie and book Victor creates the creature working with knowledge from Professor Waldman. Victor becomes so engrossed in creating this life he does not think of anything else. He completely ignores his social life and after a few years of tireless work he creates his creation. In the book he says, “I knew well therefore what would be my father's feelings, but I could not tear my thoughts from my employment, loathsome in itself, but which had taken an irresistible hold of my imagination.” He was so excited making a life he did not think twice about the consequences. Even in the movie there was just this sense of hubris he had because all he wanted to do was create life but once it was made he completely abandoned it. Ethical science includes the ramifications of an experiment but Victor went too far. The primary example of unethical spinelessness is seen in Victor Frankenstein. His constant refusal to take responsibility for his actions is what causes him to lose people in his life and hurt others. He attempts to generate life and achieves it by providing life to a creature that he presumes will die alone if he abandons it. The creature instead lives and learns on his own how to speak, read, and write. Since Frankenstein is human himself, he never foresees himself alienating his new creation and

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