Schizophrenic Patients Relapse Case Study

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Schizophrenic patients relapse more frequently than individuals with other mental illness (Csernansky & Schuchart, 2002). About 70% of newly diagnosed schizophrenic patients relapse the first year and 90% the second year (Silverstein & Bellack, 2008). One reason schizophrenic patients relapse because of the insufficient outpatient healthcare model for the severely mentally ill. Outpatient care’s purpose is to decrease confinement in a healthcare setting by giving patients more independence (Stein, Leith, Osborn, Greenberg, Petrowski, Jesse, & May, 2015). Today, outpatient’s care for severely mentally ill individuals lack knowledge and communication necessary for adequate healthcare. In particular, caregivers are limited in knowledge and skills …show more content…
This is because many staff members have little education in the care for severely mentally ill patients. (Kilbourne et al. 2012). With a limited amount of knowledge, doctors are reducing conversations about the disease and treatment options needed for the patient to improve such as medication. By patients not receiving adequate information about their illness and the side effects of the psychotropic drugs, patients are more likely to become non-adherent, leading to an increase in relapse (Hudson, Owen, Thrush, Han, Pyne, Thapa, & Sullivan, 2004). Care for these patients are being compromised because of the deficiencies within the staff. A weak faculty cascades into a weak patient recovery. With patients not recovering, doctors become discouraged and discriminate against their …show more content…
2015). This is crucial because with miscommunication recovery is more of a challenge for patients. Deficiencies in communication exacerbate the actual disease and cripple the patient’s recovery. When a patient feels like they have no say in their medicine, they are more likely to purposely miscommunication with the doctor that their medicine is working fine in order to avoid a dispute about the what really should be done about their medicine (Stein et al. 2015). Instead, patients will alter the dosage of the prescription and most likely relapse. Through specialized aid programs for schizophrenic patients obstacles to recovery are greatly

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