Satan In Milton's Paradise Lost

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Lucifer, the light bringer, and the most beautiful angel at God’s side. He shined brighter than all the other angels and had the most power next to God, but that was not enough. Cast into hell because of his pride and beginning to want nothing more than the power that was God’s and God’s alone, the fallen angel, Satan, is now commonly known as the ruler of all things evil, destructive, and bad. When thought of today, Satan brings to people’s minds things such as torture and sin, nothing at all like the light bringing angel he was once known as. Milton in Paradise Lost, however, seems to intentionally show the reader another side of this devil that takes pride in all sin, or so many people think. Milton not only shows a side of sympathy for …show more content…
This shows God’s wrath because He was so angry with Satan that when He cast him from Heaven, He sent–chained–Satan to the Lake of Fire. The Lake of Fire is comparable to a second death and is not surrounded by solid ground. Not only that, but Satan was unconscious. Satan was not aware of where he was until he awakened. Milton also shows sympathy for Satan by the way that God lets him suffer. God knows that Satan is struggling with whether to face his pride and repent or to live with what has happened, but God does nothing. God does not try to reason with Satan, in fact, God lets Satan go to Eden. Milton states in Book Four, “Sometimes towards Eden which now in his view/ Lay pleasant, his [Satan] grieved look he fixes sad,/ Somtimes towards Heav’n and the full-blazing sun,/ Which now sat high in his meridian tow’r:/ Then much revolving, thus in sighs began” (lines 28-31). Through this the point that Satan is disturbed is blatant. Through these lines, Milton is clearly showing the reader how bothered Satan is by how beautiful Eden is. This proves God’s wrath because if God is all knowing and all loving, He must have been so upset with Satan that He just let him suffer and hurt. God also let Adam and Eve sin, allowing them to become ashamed of themselves. According to Bodie Hodge, the author of The Fall of …show more content…
George Rostrevor Hamilton, the author of Hero or Fool? states just this: In passing I would note, and emphasize, how Satan’s heroic qualities are enhanced by this strain of something approaching tenderness in his character. We see it again when he is moved towards pity, and even love, by the first sight of Adam and Eve in their unsuspecting happiness, and once more when, on the very point of tempting Eve, he is disarmed for a while by her innocence. His courage and will-power are not the expression of a nature irrevocably hardened or incapable of gentle emotion.

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