Satan In Milton's Paradise Lost

Great Essays
Lucifer, the light bringer, and the most beautiful angel at God’s side. He shined brighter than all the other angels and had the most power next to God, but that was not enough. Cast into hell because of his pride and beginning to want nothing more than the power that was God’s and God’s alone, the fallen angel, Satan, is now commonly known as the ruler of all things evil, destructive, and bad. When thought of today, Satan brings to people’s minds things such as torture and sin, nothing at all like the light bringing angel he was once known as. Milton in Paradise Lost, however, seems to intentionally show the reader another side of this devil that takes pride in all sin, or so many people think. Milton not only shows a side of sympathy for …show more content…
This shows God’s wrath because He was so angry with Satan that when He cast him from Heaven, He sent–chained–Satan to the Lake of Fire. The Lake of Fire is comparable to a second death and is not surrounded by solid ground. Not only that, but Satan was unconscious. Satan was not aware of where he was until he awakened. Milton also shows sympathy for Satan by the way that God lets him suffer. God knows that Satan is struggling with whether to face his pride and repent or to live with what has happened, but God does nothing. God does not try to reason with Satan, in fact, God lets Satan go to Eden. Milton states in Book Four, “Sometimes towards Eden which now in his view/ Lay pleasant, his [Satan] grieved look he fixes sad,/ Somtimes towards Heav’n and the full-blazing sun,/ Which now sat high in his meridian tow’r:/ Then much revolving, thus in sighs began” (lines 28-31). Through this the point that Satan is disturbed is blatant. Through these lines, Milton is clearly showing the reader how bothered Satan is by how beautiful Eden is. This proves God’s wrath because if God is all knowing and all loving, He must have been so upset with Satan that He just let him suffer and hurt. God also let Adam and Eve sin, allowing them to become ashamed of themselves. According to Bodie Hodge, the author of The Fall of …show more content…
George Rostrevor Hamilton, the author of Hero or Fool? states just this: In passing I would note, and emphasize, how Satan’s heroic qualities are enhanced by this strain of something approaching tenderness in his character. We see it again when he is moved towards pity, and even love, by the first sight of Adam and Eve in their unsuspecting happiness, and once more when, on the very point of tempting Eve, he is disarmed for a while by her innocence. His courage and will-power are not the expression of a nature irrevocably hardened or incapable of gentle emotion.

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Author Dr. Phillip Zimbardo creator of the Stanford Prison Experiment states how good people can have intentions of becoming evil. He argues that good people can become bad people and that bad people can become good people. In this interesting article the author Dr. Phillip Zimbardo focuses on what really makes people become bad people. He uses Lucifer as an example. Lucifer an angel of God who used to God’s light bearer and favorite angel questions God’s authority and was sent to hell on earth.…

    • 469 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “We find it easy to tread on and crush a Worm that we see crawling on the Earth; so ’tis easy for us to cut or singe a slender Thread that any Thing hangs by; thus easy is it for God when he pleases to cast his Enemies down to Hell,” (Edwards 5). In this context, Jonathan Edwards, a minister who wrote Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God, is putting a fiery image into the minds of the Puritans who attended his sermon on the day of July 8th, 1741. At the time of the Great Awakening, there was a loss of faith directly related to the widespread use of science and theories. Edwards uses a fear-inducing tone to refuel a fire in the believers and turn them back into the arms of God. By using intense metaphors and other rhetorical devices, such as…

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The use of these words causes fear that hell will consist of much pain for the people, something they will definitely not want to be put through. By doing this, it might make the people think about their actions and decide among changing their actions and worshipping God. Edwards also uses words and imagery to compare Gods wrath to a bow that is bent. He explains that the bow is ready to pierce the hearts of all sinners and by doing this, Edwards makes you feel as if you are there experiencing…

    • 577 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Betrayal is a common theme across fiction literature and media. Showing moments of a person turning his back on his boss, leader, and superior power to become independent. Or gather their own people and fight back, become rival of their former boss. Betrayal would be like, putting your loyalty in someone, and them turning their back on yours. It is something that can happen to anybody in the real life and Paradise Lost by John Milton, Lord of the Flies by William Golding, and the hit TV series El Chema by Rafael Amaya all have the realistic and eye opening portrayals of betrayal and the impact it can have on the lives of the characters involved.…

    • 2170 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There is the dreadful pit of the glowing flames of the wrath of God; there is hell’s wide gaping mouth open; and you have nothing to stand upon, nor anything to hold of; there is nothing between you and hell but the air; it is the only power and mere pleasure of God that holds you up”. Edward uses this metaphor to express how hopeless people will be if they don’t reach out to God. It is very effective as it puts his audience on edge if they are ‘out of christ’. An example of a conceit would be,” The bow of God’s wrath is bent, and the arrow made ready on the string, and justice bends the arrow at your heart, and strings the bow, and it is nothing but the mere pleasure of God, and that of an angry God, without any promise or obligation at all, that keeps the arrow one moment from being made drunk with your blood” With this and many other descriptions combined with conceits and similes, Edward brought more followers into Christianity. His descriptive words allowed the audience to imagine perfectly the agony of hell and the wrath of an angry God.…

    • 893 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This conversation is overheard by Satan and here begins the framework for the Fall to begin. The emergence of Eve from Adam reflects the story of Narcissus. Narcissus is a mythological boy who fell in love with his own image. His love for himself was so intense that he drowned in his own image in the pool of water. (Ovid) Eve became so consumed with her own image that God led her away to keep her pure in self.…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    When Victor realizes his consequences for his immoral actions, it is too late. After Victor refuses to construct a female companion for the monster, the creature kills Victor’s loved ones, and Victor then portrays his monster as a “miserable demon whom I had sent abroad into the world for my destruction” (Shelley 215). Because he refuses to take on the responsibility for the monster’s miserable life, Victor fails to be a great creator, and therefore, he faces the monster’s wrath. Again, this is similar to “Paradise Lost” because Satan attempts to revenge on God for his wretched life.…

    • 1109 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In Milton’s Paradise Lost after being abandoned and lost Satan 's appearance begins to change into this horrifying creature who has no mercy for anyone at all, this is caused by the sadness and hatred of being abandoned by God. The same descent into evil is seen in Victor and in the Monster, when Victor is disowned by…

    • 1874 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As both stories unraveled, they were became more and more vengeful, villainous and destructive. Allusions to Paradise Lost allowed the monster to relate himself to both Adam and Satan. Before reading Paradise Lost, the monster felt alone. It made him feel as if other creatures have gone through similar experiences to his. Allusions to the poem allowed both the monster,…

    • 663 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Allusions In Frankenstein

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Mary Shelly added many allusions and references in her book Frankenstein. Specific works mentioned are a major part of what and how the monster experiences life, as this is the first time he has been able to learn about the world he has been rushed into. The books cited are Ruins of Empires, Plutarch’s Lives, Sorrows of Werther, and Paradise Lost. All four literary works have a bleak perspective on humanity. These are complete truths to the monster, consequently shaping how he now sees the world.…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Now, as Satan is entering the garden in a form of mist. He analyzes all the animals. He proceeds to mask himself as a serpent. However, Satan hesitates in completing his mission. Satan is astonished by how beautiful God’s creation is.…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Paradise lost is a poem written by John Milton that explains the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and how they were tempted by one of God’s fallen angels Satan. Throughout the books Satan defies God and the debate starts whether Satan is a hero or anti-hero. I find in books one and two Satan appears more of a hero and that Blake was of not the Devils party. Book one of paradise lost explains that Milton was not of the devils’ party in regards to Satan was once an angel of light until he went against God. Satan rises off the Lake and challenges God with his speech to get God’s angels to turn there back and join the devils’ army.…

    • 1275 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Milton, here, is reaffirming the fact that the reality of Hell is bleak; Satan and his followers are very much removed from the light of Heaven. Then, however, the passage shifts, “profoundest Hell / Receive thy new possessor” (251-252). Milton’s use of the word, profoundest, is very peculiar; it means something of great nonmaterial, usually intellectual, depth. Hell perhaps, Satan implies, is not as shallow as it first looks. Yes, Hell is located in the depths of the universe, but it also has more substance than that.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Satan Nature In Dracula

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages

    How does the undead nature of Dracula affect the outcome of other characters lives? In the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker, Jonathan the main character travels to Count Dracula’s castle to tell him about some real estate; however, he gets trapped inside with Count who possesses inhuman powers. Jonathan manages to escape back home returning to his fiancee Mina Murray. Mina spends most of the time when Jonathan is gone with her best friend Lucy Westenra.…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Free will is an extremely important concept in John Milton’s Paradise Lost that greatly impacts the fateful decision made by Adam and Eve. Many questions are raised in the face of a notion such as free will, which prompt the reader and Milton to understand God’s logic and Adam and Eve’s reasoning for turning their backs on it. God makes his new creations “just and right / sufficient to have stood, though free to fall,” and, therefore, obtain the explicitly stated ability to turn against God. The first instance of free will the reader sees is Satan’s decision to rebel against God and attempt to defeat Him and all of the angels that joined him in his efforts. Although God experiences this defiance and is forced to punish Satan for his…

    • 1028 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays