Sapir-Whorf And Chomsky's Theory Of Language And Universalism

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Psycholinguists have debated the topic of language’s origin and meaning for centuries.
These theories are valuable tools to expanding our minds, but can also easily morph our learning process and worldview on the importance of language. This work briefly explains the basis of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, along with Chomsky’s theory of Universal Grammar, and the criticisms of both. Cognitive awareness and strict adhesion to one perspective of language origin has the ability to actively shape language development itself. Sapir-Whorf and Universalism were both grounded in an attempt to explain language, but were studied in fairly biased experiments. In agreement with most modern studies, this piece claims neither theory can be entirely true. Therefore, readers should gain an understanding of the complexity of both Whorf and Chomsky’s studies while regarding both as theories
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Specifically, the research compiled explains the inherent uncertainty in these ideas and the consequent dangers of delving into the complicated study.
Keywords: Universalism, Linguistic Relativity, Sapir-Whorf, Psycholinguistic, Language, Cognition

Language, the most diverse yet universal concept, has existed since the beginning of mankind. An important aspect of growth and development, language is the means by which ideas are communicated. Defined by Merriam-Webster as “a systematic means of communicating ideas or feelings by the use of conventionalized signs, sounds, gestures, or marks having understood meanings,” language is inclusive of both verbal and nonverbal communication between two people with a common understanding (2017 version). Intricate variations among the thousands of languages around the world magnify two

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