Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Kubla Khan And The Romantic Movement

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Literature is a fundamental basis for humanity. Throughout the years mankind has inhabited the Earth, recording culture, values, stories and events through the written word. Writing these stories down are their authors, many of which have become well known and world renowned for their creativity and contribution to the world’s libraries. One such author is Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a English poet and author who helped to create the romantic movement, additionally demonstrating the elements that made up the literary movement in his works. Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born on October 21, 1775 in England. From a young age he was an avid reader, where “he immersed himself to the point of morbid fascination in romances and Eastern tales such …show more content…
One such is the poem of “Kubla Khan”, a piece written after he awoke from an opium induced dream. The work describes a wondrous and beautiful land called Xanadu, where the great river Alp stretches through this wild and mysterious land. The title itself refers to the grandson of the vicious war Mongol, Genghis Khan. It is his palace, referred to as a pleasure dome, that is heavily described in the work. The towers of the structure are described to be “...girdled round:/And here were gardens bright with sinuous rills/Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree” (Coleridge 7-8). This is portraying the vivid imagery of the palace surrounded with beautiful, fragrant gardens. In fact, the entire world of Xanadu is covered with different types of plant life, such as cedar trees and various bright …show more content…
Bringing the strange girl home with her, Christabel soon comes to the realization that not all is well with this woman, and is later placed under a spell to not be able to tell anyone about the events that had taken place that night. Once Cristabel begins to realize just how horrible Geraldine truly is she is unable to share her realizations with her friends. The poem unfortunately ends here, as Coleridge was never able to finish the

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