The Rise Of Feminism

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Feminism
Feminism is a topic that attracts the attention because it embraces the belief that all humans are entitled to freedom and liberty within reason including civil rights. Also, discrimination should not be made base on gender, sexual orientation, skin color, ethnicity, religion culture or lifestyle. Feminism is allowing women to expand their career and business that they never were able to have before. The focus of the research to show how women are becoming independent and can be equally treated as the man. Nowadays women have power in government and also hold high and powerful jobs. It’s interesting to know that in the 21st-century, feminism is a strong topic, even though women have proven that they are capable of functioning and
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The inception of feminist movements has greatly contributed to the growth of participation of women in aspects such as work, leaderships, and political positions. Over history, the American society has experienced significant waves of feminist activism. These feminist waves helped in creating chances for women on all fronts such as equality in jobs, and occupation of public offices. On the other hand, the feminist waves have continued to increase the chances of women in both American political front and public life. Between the year 1960 and 1970, women’s rights fighting groups and initiatives were wide sections that comprised the fight for women rights and recognition. This led to the establishment of the slogan “the personal is political” (Friedman 21), which was a key strategy for the second wave of the feminist …show more content…
The basic reference to the role of women in the household is that they are to take care of their homes. Prior to the 1960’s the issue of homemaking was decided on the aspect of gender-specified roles. “The formation of second wave feminist movement had one focus on abolishing such concords the adoption of feminism strategies and widespread for advocacy for woman’s role led to the rise of household dependent on women from 4.1% in 1970’s to an estimated 10% in 2000” (Salper, 440). This was a massive contribution as it revolutionized the household aspect in

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