Same-Sex Marriage Case Study

1578 Words 7 Pages
Findings
Crosstab
Figure 1 presents the level of perceived impact of same-sex marriage by racial categories. Overall, 56% of the respondents perceive same-sex marriage to have a large impact on their personal lives, while 28% some (moderate levels of) impact and 16% expect little to no impact. A higher proportions of respondents expect a large impact among those who identify as Hispanic/Latino (60%), Native American (61%), and multiracial (63%). Among black respondents (both those who only identify as black and multiracial blacks), approximately 16% expect little to no impact of same-sex marriage on their lives, 30% some impact, and 51% a large impact—lowest proportion of respondents expecting a large impact among all racial categories. This
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Overall, most respondents consider sexual identity to be more important (43%) or both identities to be equally important (37%). While most (61%) of respondents who perceive same-sex marriage to have a large impact on their lives consider their sexual identity to be more important than racial identity, only 43% of respondents who consider their racial identity over sexual identity in salience do the same. Among race categories, black (including multiracial blacks) and Native American respondents have higher percentages of respondents than other racial groups or the overall sample population who consider their racial identity to be more important than sexual identity (32% and 28% each and 30% of multiracial blacks compared to 21% of the overall sample population). Taken together, black LGBTs stronger racial identity salience than other LGBTs may influence their perceived level of impact of same-sex marriage, and therefore, require a separate analysis to better understand the unique relationship between their identities and perception of …show more content…
Respondents who prioritize their racial identity over sexual identity in importance are significantly less likely to perceive a large importance of same-sex marriage. Again, the effects of relative identity salience indicate that black LGBTs racial and sexual identities provide heterogeneous frames regarding the impacts of same-sex marriage, confirming Hypothesis 1. Furthermore, respondents’ experiences of possible racial discrimination in the LGBT community have no effect on their perception of same-sex marriage, but respondents who report having experiences of possible discrimination based on their LGBT statuses significantly higher likelihood in perceiving a large impact of same-sex marriage with 13% higher odds. These findings indicate that black LGBTs collective LGBT identity is invoked when they have experiences of LGBT identity-based discrimination and in turn, affects their perception of same-sex marriage, providing evidence in support of Hypothesis 2. However, the fact that previous experiences of racial discrimination do not have the same effects was unexpected; this may indicate that black collective identity invocation has limits in the ways in which they affect which cultural frame is to be dominant when black LGBTs consider LGBT-specific social issues like same-sex

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