Russian Monarchy Essay

1418 Words 6 Pages
The statements of the nobility in 1760 and 1860, in supplications, reflect an overall shift in the way that the Russian public regarded the monarch. In 1760, the position of the monarch was regarded with a sense of superiority, where all respect was directed. The monarch’s power was unquestioned and their judgment was seen as most informed, only allocating indirect power to provincial personnel or hand selected advisors. In the 1860s, after the state building of Catherine the Great which further delegated powers to other parts of the government, the status of the monarch was seen as less omnipotent. This, along with the actions of the Imperial power ruling at the time, made the This is seen in the way they address their concerns to the powers …show more content…
Unlike his predecessor Catherine the monarch, Alexander II, was not as favored by his subjects. The monarchs were not excluded from this sentiment against him, as in their class emerged a branch of young educated nobles, who would later make it their focus to bring the emperor’s demise. Furthermore, following Alexander’s emancipation of the serfs in 1856, an attitude of distrust created a wedge between the tsar and the nobles and the structure of the addresses, makes this evident. Though the addresses of each of the addresses in the 1860s differ in tone, to some degree due to the growth of provincial leadership in the 100 years since the original addresses, the feelings generally followed a similar goal and …show more content…
Such a lack of respect was not the only derivative of the actions of the monarch with the emancipation, but also a lack of trust in the decisions that the monarch may make. To compensate for such distrust, the nobles take a tone which is assertive over Alexander, implying that their suggestions are more conducive to improving the welfare of the Russian state. They write to the Tsar “But there is still much to do in order to rebuild the shaken edifice of the state on firm foundations.”, insisting that Alexander understands that the abolition of serfdom does not resolve the issues of Russia completely, rather produces a degree of instability in itself that the State must deal with, in order to sustain itself. The nobles taking a tone of educating the Tsar is an indication of the belief that they, as the nobility understood what needed to be done, while Alexander did not, which would not have been done by Catherine’s

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