Consequences Of Mistake In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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It can be seen from the book Frankenstein, written by Mary Shelley, that running away from one's problems serves them no good. It can cause more problems that could have otherwise been avoided had it been dealt with from the very beginning. It is never too late to fix a problem, but some of the consequences of not having fixed it earlier are irreversible. Therefore, one should never wait to fix a mistake. Throughout Mary Shelley's book, Frankenstein, a recurring theme that can be seen is that one should never run away from his/her problems or mistakes; it will only make them worse. In Chapter 5 of Frankenstein, Victor finally brings his creature to life, and, rather than dealing with it immediately, he runs away from it. When he sees the …show more content…
He riles the creature up by telling him, "Your threats cannot move me to do an act of wickedness; but they confirm me in a determination of not creating you a companion in vice. Shall I, in cool blood, set loose upon the earth a daemon whose delight is in death and wretchedness?" (205). Victor blatantly insults the creature, despite the fact that the creature is much more capable of hurting him than he is the creature. He shows the readers that he knows what is going to happen, yet no action can be seen. He notes, "I shuddered to think who might be the next victim sacrificed to his insatiate revenge" (206). This quote shows that he knows that people will suffer under the creature. The last thing Victor wants is to lose his family, and that may be why the creature decides that that was how he was going to hurt him. His unwillingness and lack of action or drive to do anything about his problems is seen in this quote, "I desired that I might pass my life on that barren rock...uninterrupted by any sudden shock of misery. If I returned, it was...to see those...I...loved die under...a daemon whom I had myself created" (207). When the irreversible has been done—the irreversible being the continuous killing of those whom Victor loves, he finally comes to his …show more content…
He promises to subject the creature to torture and then death. He hopes that, after fulfilling his task, he may join his dead family and that they will be grateful to receive him. Unfortunately, it is too late to do anything about it— "When I appeared almost within grasp of my foe, my hopes were suddenly extinguished, and I lost all trace of him more utterly than I had ever done before" (257). The creature is extremely strong and is more capable of handling the weather of the North Pole (where he is attempting to get Victor to go), and he is a lot faster than Victor. He keeps eluding him. Towards the end of the book, Victor dies unfulfilled and miserable. The creature decides to kill himself after he sees that Victor has died, (271-277). Both characters have suffered unnecessarily, and that is all a cause of Victor's unwillingness to face his mistakes. As it was previously stated, some of the consequences of not fixing one's problems earlier are irreversible. That is the case in the book,

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