Rules Of The Game Film Analysis

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Rules of the Game by Jean Renoir is a film that depicts members of upper-class French society and their servants prior to the beginning of World War II, showing their moral cruelty on the eve of impending destruction. Rules of the Game gives an insight into the history of France and how the difference in social classes made a vast difference in how one was treated and how one was judged or looked upon. Whether the upper classes did something good or bad most of the time they were looked at with good eyes and weren’t judged as badly as were those from the lower classes. By watching this film we can learn a lot about France’s culture, history, and society. We can also learn about the historical problems that the film caused and questions it raised. …show more content…
As he wrote his script Renoir referred to the film as “an exact description of the bourgeoisie of our time.” I feel that in France if you belonged to a high social class it was acceptable to have a mistress or an affair. An article from the Local states “In many countries, such tales would mark the end of a politician’s career. In France it seems to have the opposite effect, giving them a poll boost” ("- The Local Why it really is ok to Stray in France", 2011). It seems as if the point that Renoir made was true back then and still is true. I feel that in society, if you belonged to high social class having a mistress was fine. Genevieve de Marras states in the film that “Love, as it exists in society, is merely the mingling of two whims and the contact of two skins” (Genevieve, Renoir, "Rules of the Game"). So society didn’t view love as an intense feeling of deep affection but as simply sexual contact and the attraction between two …show more content…
It also helps to greatly understand the developments in French cinema that later led to the new wave, which was an international turning point in filmmaking. The Rules of the Game is known to have been one of the best films ever created. Even though his film was booed and hated by the audience Renoir didn’t take it as a failure but as a way to improve the film which he did. He shortened the film down to eighty five minutes and cut out parts that were too much for the audience. Despise the “failure” of the first film The Rules of the Game was still one of the best films ever. According to Alexander Sesonske “The Rules of the Game is remembered as a commentary on the moral callousness of the European upper class and their servants just before World War II” (Eric D. Snider, "Film.com What 's the Big Deal?

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