Rudeness: A Fictional Narrative

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"It doesn't matter who number five is. I won't be letting you hurt them," Iridian said confidently, as he began texting someone. Texting at the dinner table? How rude. "You don't know the first thing about kindness, about love," Ilya whispered, getting up and walking closer to me. I raised my eyebrow slightly, curious as to what he was going to do next, as he continued, "and I feel sorry for you, you sadistic f---." Then, Iridian punched me square in the face, hitting my nose.

It would be an understatement to say I was merely shocked by his sudden action, I was bewildered. I doubled over, cupping my nose with one of my hands. It didn't help much, if at all, as blood seeped through my hand, and dripped out onto the table and floor. I shut

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