The Real Rosie The Riveter Analysis

Better Essays
Rosie the Riveter Revisited: Women, The War, and Social Change details the lives of “the real Rosie the riveters” through oral history. Gluck interviews multiple women that lived during World War 2 as they expose the real aspects of daily life of women during WW2. Throughout this book these interviewee personal stories gives life to the iconic symbol of the Rosie The Riveter character portrayed in the mass distributed poster by J. Howard Miller that became a symbolic depiction of working women during war time as their husbands, sons and fathers went of to war. Gluck also shows how women react to the return of men to the work force as the war ends. Gluck argues that the ‘Rosie’ era was bigger than the players involved and that it had direct …show more content…
With this in mind women were to maintain the home meaning cooking, cleaning, taking care of their husbands and kids lives ect. After the depression set in many women were subsequently pushed toward joing the workforce to keep their families together. After the United States entered World War 2 women were called on to help wartime efforts as many of the countries men went off to war. President Roosevelt 's Fireside Chat on Columbus Day of 1942 shifted the nation views on women and Black Americans joining the work forces as help from any source was needed as many of the country men were enlisted to fight in the war. Women were asked to do jobs previously looked at as to high-skilled or inappropriate for women piror to the war like working as a machinist or factory workers. Women that worked prior to the war did less extinctive work that was generally looked at as "unskilled" labor. President Roosevelt 's commented to three press association representatives on the work being done by the women in skilled labor positions stating: “I was impressed by the large proportion of women employed—doing skilled manual labor running machines” . Reflecting the common notion that women during this time period were unable to partake in skilled tasks as such aircraft or car production. The increases of workers needed to furnish items need by the armed forces to fight in the war would change that thought of women as …show more content…
One of the women intervied by Gluck was a Black American named Fanny Christina Hill, a women who previous to the war worked as a house keeper for white people. Being black, a woman and single in her early life made life very difficult for her leaving Hill to the house keeping position she held. After marriage to her husband Joseph Hill she found work as she moved with her husband to Los Angeles, Ca. working for North American Aviation a company that showed initiative in hiring Black American as labors during this period. Hill is quoted stating “The war made me live better, it really did. My sister always said that Hitler was the one that got us out of the white folks’ kitchen.” The side-effects of World War II offered Hill the opportunity she needed to make a better life for herself and also passing down this new independence onto the next generation of women by allowing her daughter to live out her

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Women took on jobs that were traditionally meant for men, for example; farm labor, and selling items(Ott 1). The Civil War pushed women to break free from societal bounds, to aid in the war effort. Although women were working hard they were still payed less than men. Women were working in factories in order to develop the necessary goods for the war(Tendrich 55). New responsibilities on the home-front pushed women to contribute to the war effort by making goods for the military.…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When The Great Depression hit, women's role in the workplace was quickly changing. Women's place in society as working women was still heavily frowned upon. The jobs women could choose from would be clerical workers, teachers, nurses, telephone operators, and domestics largely found work. So while in the 1920 women's employment rate doubled from the war the number quickly shrunk back down due to 24% of employed women in the 1930s.…

    • 1301 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Roles During Ww2

    • 1453 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Women Roles During World War II World War II forever changed the normative role of women. Before the war, a woman’s worth was determined by what she can do within her household. They were seen as inferior to men and exemplified the traditional role of taking care of the children, cooking and cleaning. However, the war changed people’s thoughts and ideas which gave women tremendous opportunities. World War II created jobs for women when the men in their families left for the war.…

    • 1453 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Role In Ww2

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The campaign was directed towards women in the workplace (offering to upgrade them to factory jobs with higher pay), high school girls, and married women with children whose husbands were fighting on the warfront (Hoyt 3). Most of the women involved in any job was not working for money, they felt that they were helping to support the war because they were making weaponry and other products for men to use in war instead of doing housework at home. All of the effort made into persuading women was driven by a main message. The idea of the Women in War Jobs campaign was advertised to all women across America to help convince women to join the workforce. The main goal and message of Rosie the Riveter was to acknowledge the importance of patriotism and the idea that war would end sooner if women at home filled the shoes of men fighting on the warfront (Hoyt…

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, they were determined to work because they were finally able to do work to prove themselves to be as capable as men. All in all, women impacted the war effort by working in these factories as they made most of the weaponry during World War One. Not to mention, “women’s employment rates increased from 23.6% of the working age population in 1914 to between 37.7% and 46.7% in 1918” because of the various other jobs they took a role in. “They took up jobs as railway guards and ticket collectors, buses and tram conductors, postal workers, police, firefighters and bank tellers”. Women were not able to work out of their homes before war was declared.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mass media is a powerful tool. Radio broadcasts and newspaper articles convinced women that their husbands needed ammunition to fight World War II, so women worked in factories to help the war effort. Many females played dual roles as they worked outside the home and took care of their homes and families while their husbands were away. Rosie the Riveter was considered a heroine. Her “We Can Do It” attitude empowered women.…

    • 640 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women After Ww2

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Rosie the Riveter was a symbol of how women helped the war effort and also they were the key of winning the war because they made production faster to supply the army. In conclusion, U.S. involvement happened after the Pearl Harbor attacks. Men left home to fight war. Resulting to a shortage in the workforce. It also started a chance for women to be a part of the community by working in jobs that once they were not allowed.…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Before the Civil War, women were portrayed as petite beings that had to be cared for and looked after by their husbands and male relatives. However, during the Civil War and afterwards, women, as a whole, went through major social change. The article, “Breaking Tradition,” by Kathleen Ernst, effectively details all the changes that women went through during a life of war and freedom from social standards previously set for all females before the men were sent off. Ernst uses a variety of strategies to argue her point, and effectively support her claim that the Civil War brought social change to women. To begin, Kathleen Ernst uses a multitude of examples of change in the article.…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    World War II brought about a lot of change for women 's roles in the United states; however, after the war most of this positive change revolved back to how it was before the war. With a lack of men to fill jobs women were needed to replace them. It became more socially accepted for a woman to be in a traditionally male job. Many women began work in factories, and other jobs that would not previously been likely to hire women. Between 1940 and 1945 six million women went to work for the first time.…

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The United State did not have enough male soldiers to defend an entire country. During their efforts recruiting Women into the work force, they started using Rosie the Riveter as a character to show how women were strong and how they could work in factories. “Rosie was the modern factory girl – a woman who could effortlessly bridge the gap between masculine and feminine” (Hawkes). Although women were encourage to work, not all of them wanted to work even with the county’s propaganda. Women were adapted to staying home and the industry field was totally different than their work at home.…

    • 1635 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics