Rose Erickson's Parents Effect On Child Behavior

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Every day in America, babies are born with their own free spirit. However, as they grow, their subconscious is constantly being molded by their parents. Children are bound to their parents’ actions, whether they know it or not. The way an adult acts shapes how their child matures. Children and teenagers in America have a tendency to mimic the behavior of their parents. Therefore, the values and attitudes a parent exhibits during early childhood, influence their child’s development into adulthood. Children are influenced by their parents’ behavior at a young age and imitate this behavior as they grow older. In her article “Parents’ Effect on Child Behavior,” Rose Erickson suggests that “Children are like sponges. They model everything a parent …show more content…
Erickson warns that “child abuse causes a range of antisocial and destructive behaviors” (6). If a parent abuses their child, for any reason, whether it be out of anger or from drunken rage, the child can become emotionally scarred, causing dysfunctional behavior in the child. At the slightest provocation, the child can become violent, aggressive, or withdrawn around people. In her article “Child Abuse and Neglect,” Dr. Jeanne Segal, Helpguide co-founder and intelligence expert, reports that “children who are abused may not be able to express their feelings safely and as a result, may develop difficulties regulating their emotions” (9). These children look at the world through different eyes and struggle with their emotions which can lead to anxiety or depression. They see potential friends as potential threats and have difficulty trusting others. Child abuse can lead the victim to live a lonely and destructive …show more content…
D. Salinger, Holden’s hostility is a result of his parents’ emotional neglect and physical abuse. When Holden’s roommate, Stradlater, comes back from a date with his friend, Jane, Holden questions him about what they did. When Stradlater refuses to give him an answer, Holden tries “to sock him, with all [his] might, right smack in the toothbrush” (Salinger 43). Holden is a violent kid who tries to hurt Stradlater when he will not give details about his date with Jane. His violent tendencies are spurred by his parents’ emotional neglect. In her essay “Holden’s Lousy Childhood: Poor Parenting and the Rise of Postwar Juvenile Delinquency,” Rachel Kirkwood writes “… the couple [relied] on third party institutions such as boarding schools and psychiatrists to raise their child” (2). Holden’s parents are incapable of raising their son so they send him away to boarding schools and psychiatrists. His parents also react in odd ways to him, having “two hemorrhages a piece if I told anything pretty personal about them” (Salinger 1). Holden keeps his feelings bottled up inside because his parents do not allow him to speak his mind without getting defensive. This contributes to his sudden outbursts of hostility and anxiety. Holden’s dad is seen to be sexually abusive to him. After he leaves Mr. Antolini’s house, Holden says, “That kind of stuff happened to me about twenty times since I was a kid. I can’t stand it” (193). Holden is not a

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