Roosevelt's Speech Analysis

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The Great Depression was the deepest and longest-lasting economical downturn the western world had ever experienced. It had begun soon after the Stock Market crash of 1929, which had sent Wall Street into a frenzied panic. Millions of investors were wiped out, and over the course of the next several years the deeper effects of the Depression began to surface. The sudden and sharp decrease of consumer spending and investment caused decline in industrial production. The lack of production needed therefore warranted a smaller workforce causing major layoffs to occur. In short, the lack of consumer spending made supply increase monumentally. Even with already thirteen million Americans left unemployed by the Great Depression, there were still …show more content…
His inauguration speech, for example, is an example of such attitude. While definitionally his speech was more of an address, he still phrased it as if he was having conversation with the American public. Consequently, it seemed to make him, at least in the eyes of citizens, more comforting. For example, the first line in his speech was “I am certain that my fellow Americans expect that on my induction...“ By stating “...my fellow Americans” he’s making it evidently clear that he’s not only a politician, but also a member of the general public as well. Furthermore, littered throughout the speech are promises and pledges made by Roosevelt to fix ongoing issues formed as a result of the Great Depression. The most common issue, being the unemployment rate and lack of jobs, was addressed multiple times in the speech: ‘Our greatest primary task is to put people to work. This is no unsolvable problem if we face it wisely and courageously.” While it’s a bold claim to say that the issue of unemployment is most certainly solvable, he says so nonetheless. Simply, he whitewashed the issues not to only maintain support for his administration, but to also inspire hope in his …show more content…
More specifically, we can look at how the writing in some of the advertisements for the New Deal policies were portrayed to get a better idea on how the administration transferred information regarding fixing issues spawned from the Great depression. An example of one of these policies was Social Security. Social Security was designed as a method to payback workers after retirement so that their children would not have to care directly for them. The Social Security’s Security in Your Old Age pamphlet is an example of such writing that can be examined. The pamphlet starts with a small summary of what the law will do. What is more important, however, is the format the follows. There is a “WHAT THIS MEANS TO YOU” sub-heading which implies a simplified breakdown of the law and its relevance. This is a way for the Roosevelt Administration to directly communicate with the general public. This breakdown of communications allows the administration to avoid confusing or potentially losing the trust of the American citizens: “The checks will come to you as a right. You will get them regardless of the amount of property or income you may have.“ By being upfront about what the law does the trust that was lost as a result of the Stock Market crash of 1932 is able to start being

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