Ronald M. Green Building A Baby From The Genes Up Analysis

Decent Essays
In Ronald M. Green’s “Building a Baby From the Genes Up,” Green shares an anecdote, gives his support for genetic modification, addresses opposing arguments, refutes the opposing argument, and finishes with his support for genetic modification. His thesis is because genetic modification is already happening, we may as well embrace it and make it a part of our lives. In the other essay “Genetically Modified Humans? No Thanks” written by Richard Hayes, he addresses Green and his argument right off the bat, disagrees with him, and then continues to refute Green’s points for the duration of the essay. Hayes’ thesis states that once genetic modification starts, there is no way to stop it from advancing into something worse. Both of these arguments …show more content…
In the beginning, it is said he teaches at Dartmouth College in the Religion Department and is also an author with some published books, which establishes his ethos as a credible source. Differently, he establishes his emotional appeals when he talks about the anecdote of the British couple trying to prevent their child from possibly developing breast cancer, the instance of a child prone to obesity that would not have to suffer with that disease, and the example he gave about disabled children being loved anyways. It makes the audience pity the families with disabled children and families that have harmful genes. On another note, Green uses logos when he mentions the Human Fertilization Embryology Authority and the National Institute of Health. He states that “like it or not, that decision [to allow genetic modification] is a sign of things to come- and not necessarily a bad sign,” which leads people to the conclusion that changing the human genome is beneficial. Some strong points in the argument are when Green addresses the counter argument. He describes and explains what people on the opposing side feel about genetic modification, such as when he states that some people believe that changing a human’s genome is playing God. Also, Green uses statistics about medical students disagreeing with genetic modification. Overall, Green’s argument gave valid reasons for what he believes and why in accordance with his view that …show more content…
The fact that he is the Executive Director of the Center for Genetics and Society, establishes that he is a reliable source that people can trust. Similarly, Hayes establishes pathos in how he asks the question: if we allow genetic modification to regularly occur, where does it end? He explains that “...genetic modification would likely spark a techno-eugenic rat race,” and goes on to explain the implications of this, which furthers his argument and aims to make the audience nervous about genetic modification. Later, logos is shown through the statistic Hayes gives about forty countries’ genetic modification regulations. Hayes’ strong points consist of exposing Green’s equivocation of the words “genetic technologies” and distinguishing what the two types of genetic technologies

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