Romeo And Juliet Mindset Analysis

1528 Words 7 Pages
We all know Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, but one question ponders in our minds; who is to blame for the death of the star-crossed lovers? This question can’t be answered with just one single person; however there are a few main characters that play a significant part leading to the couple’s death. Tybalt was a factor in their death who acted as a catalyst to the problem due to his cockiness and his hot-headed mindset. Friar Lawrence, who was an advisor to both Romeo and Juliet, was one of the first characters contributing to the lover’s deaths because of his inadequate plans. And lastly, Juliet’s parents are also to blame for they were inconsistent with their affection and later on too persistent for Juliet to marry Paris, regardless if …show more content…
Friar Lawrence was an advisor to both Romeo and Juliet. Not being able to trust anyone else, the pair trusted the cleric with problems. Through human nature, the friar gave answers regardless if it was thought through or not. He shouldn’t have agreed to marry them in the first place. However, he thought “This alliance may so happy prove to turn your households' rancor to pure love,” (Shakespeare 2.3.96-99) therefore agreeing to marry them; neglecting the other consequences, even if he was aware of them (Shakespeare 2.6.9-15). With his actions, we can see the story continuously declining. Friar Lawrence could’ve ended it there and admitted that it was a bad idea, yet he kept continuing to support the couple and gave them hope. The more he allowed their love to continue, the more they fell in love and out of their minds for each other. It came to the point where Juliet was threatening to kill herself if Friar Lawrence couldn’t help. He then gave her a last minute plan to fake her death. He never really think about this plan through, it was made right then and there for the sake of Juliet not killing herself. He could’ve advised her to tell her parent about her and Romeo, or he could’ve done so himself. He was a holy man and everyone respected him (Shakespeare 5.3.279), therefore the Capulets would’ve understood the situation better-about Romeo’s motivations leading to Tybalt’s death, coming from the …show more content…
They were very inconsistent with their opinions and affections towards Juliet. In the beginning of Act 1, we see Lord Capulet as a responsible father telling Paris that Juliet is too young for marriage (Shakespeare 1.2.7-11). Juliet is his prized possession and he cares about her daughter greatly. He advises Paris to win Juliet’s heart instead. He is also seen to have an easygoing mind; having a calm manner even with Romeo, a Montague, in his mansion during the party. But after Tybalt’s death, things seem to change drastically. Lord Capulet appears to be too embedded in grief that his emotions and temper becomes easily provoked. He insists on Juliet marrying Paris, ironic to what he had said earlier. His patience with Juliet declines, threatening to disown her when she tries to negotiate his plan on marrying Paris, then states “my fingers itch,” which foreshadows his possible intentions of physical violence (Shakespeare 3.5.166-170). He then threatens her further, claiming “and you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, for, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee, nor what is mine shall never do thee good: trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn,” (Shakespeare 3.5.204-207). Following this, Lady Capulet too, turns her back on her own daughter, refusing to talk to her in any way. She has always wanted Juliet to marry Paris for he was thought to be the ideal guy and it

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