Relationships In Romeo And Juliet And The Laboratory

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Browning and Shakespeare both portray tumultuous relationships and the character’s various emotions with the use of structure and language in their work. In 'The Laboratory, ' Browning creates an image of the narrator to be revengeful and one that wants to cause pain and suffering; This is evident with the use of the monosyllabic words ‘grind...mash, pound’, and this also signifies the speed at which the narrator wants to achieve her goal. The poet tries to convey to the reader that, the narrator does not want to leave the mistress or forgive her. The narrator wants to physically hurt the mistress so much that it should compensate for her mental and emotional pain. Even though, the lover is at fault here, the narrator does not focus on him …show more content…
Romeo gives too much importance to Juliet and puts her in a position of higher authority in his life; referring to her as a ‘shrine’. When the young man first meets Juliet he says, ‘she doth teach the torches to burn bright’, showing that she is very pretty, like ‘a snowy dove trooping with crows.’ The words ‘dove’ and crows’ juxtapose each other and Shakespeare evidently does this to emphasise the beauty of Juliet and why Romeo finds her very attractive. ‘Burns’ and ‘bright’ foreshadow Romeo’s future as, later in the text it is in fact Juliet, that causes his death. It makes the reader wonder, how can something described to be so bright and pure cause pain and suffering. The two texts depict the theory that tumultuous relationships are the cause of destruction, and this is evident as the narrator is shown as being very powerful and in a position of authority, however, she is also portrayed to be confused and demented, leaving her to question whether, in reality she is powerful or …show more content…
Romeo comes to the Capulet’s ball for Rosaline (his love). However, instantly as he sees Juliet he is mesmerized and ‘falls in love with her’. This is shown to be very typical and usual showing that strong relationships could not be formed in the Elizabethan Era. It is because, parents always looked for a bride/groom that was wealthy and powerful so that their family own family also gain power. Many other relationships such as the one Tybalt and Lord Capulet share, also show bitterness. Tybalt wants to fight Romeo at the ball as he realises he’s a Montague (his enemy). Tybalt appears to be a foil to Romeo and this is further shown by the hatred Tybalt has for the Montagues. Although Tybalt is made to ‘withdraw’ he is not satisfied but still has to obey his uncle’s orders as this was also a value taught in the Elizabethan Era. Children from a young age were taught to respect their elders and follow all orders. Tybalt’s hate but respect is still evident as he states ‘intrusion shall…now seeming sweet convert to bitter’. The oxymoron used is to reiterate that, Tybalt’s anger has not been appeased and he will get his revenge. The phrase also foreshadows Romeo’s death because in Act 3, Scene 1, Tybalt ends up killing Mercutio due to his anger and rage and this leads to Romeo’s eventual downfall as he has nobody to support him. Shakespeare uses this relationship between

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