Romanticism In The Ending Of Huckleberry Finn

1934 Words 8 Pages
A wise man, John Galsworthy, once said that "the beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy." Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn serves as a magnificent example of untidy endings. Many presented their cases for and against the method in which Twain ended his literary masterpiece. While the ending seems out of place from the previous chapters because of the unnecessarily complicated prison break and moral childishness, the closing chapters actually propel the novel to a position of literary perfection. The ending of Huckleberry Finn makes the book a literary masterpiece because it symbolizes the end of society meddling in Huck's life, brings the reader to the same mood seen at the beginning, contains no definite …show more content…
Furthermore, Gullason argues that "with Huckleberry Finn, Twain tries to "kill" romanticism" (Gullason 87) and does this by sinking two ships, the Lally Rook and Walter Scott, both of which refer to romanticism. By doing this, Twain already placed a bounty on the head of romanticism and only uses the end to annihilate romantic traditions. Thus, the ending utilizes ridiculous behavior in order to embarrass romanticism and win sympathy for realist traditions because the reader acknowledges the cruelty in Tom's …show more content…
For instance, one of the lines in the novel that can validate this argument belongs to Huck, when he decides to break Jim out of prison, and reads, "all right, then, I'll go to hell" (Twain 304). Huck rejects slavery which represents his final rejection of society. Neil Schmitz, former professor at the State Univeristy of New York at Buffalo, would agree with the belief that the ending symbolizes the rejection of society. Specifically, Schmitz would say, "Huck's resistance to oppressive authority always begins at his skin" (Neil Schmitz); he chooses tobacco and artful cussing "knowing that they mean an overt repudiation of Miss Watson's meticulous world" (Neil Schmitz). Schmitz suggests that Huck's tobacco and artful cussing make up his rejection of Miss Watson's world. In addition, Huck rejects this world when he decides to break a former slave and his friend, Jim, out of prison. In like fashion, Tom, after realizing Jim got recaptured, says to "turn him (Jim) loose! He ain't no slave; he's as free as any creature that walks this earth!" (Twain 401). Tom, a hound of society, by demanding Jim be freeded rejects slavery and chooses equality and abolitionism over Miss Watson's world: a society that supports institutions such as slavery and racism. Therefore, Tom's

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