Role Of Community Policing

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The role of the Community and Police The Job of the administration of justice in the United States is to serve and protect the welfare of its citizens. Police departments biggest responsibility is to make sure they are serving the community, all too many times, police departments fight against the community instead of working with the community. But not all of the responsibility should go on police departments, since there are limited resources and manpower for many of the departments. The role of the community, has a huge part on keeping any city or town safe. This paper will be going over the Sir Robert Peel 's nine principals, how police departments should be training there officers, and the different types of community policing,
Sir Robert
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For the Police chiefs still make their departments work on the beat or try to get their quotas up every month, are not helping their communities at all. A few underlying issues of what cops should and do behave when on duty. 1. Community Policing vs Police Paramilitary Units, Many police departments help around their community by holding sporting leagues like POW, to make sure the majority of kids don 't fall victim to the gangs in their neighborhoods. On the other end, Police have made these Paramilitary Units, known as SWAT. SWAT being a great unit to have for emergencies, are often used for more than emergencies, they are often used for drug raids. Some community members are not happy seeing these military like units in their neighborhoods busting down doors, putting fear into people 's children. 2. Police Loyalty vs Police Integrity, Hugh M. Culbertson author of “A key step in police-community relations: Identify the divisive issues” states, “One such issue is the conflict between loyalty to fellow officers and integrity - telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. The need for loyalty is not hard to understand. Police often operate in dangerous places where they …show more content…
Another good practice of community policing is for police officers to go to the town meetings, Brian C. Renauer, author of, “Measuring police-community co-production: Trade-offs in two observational approaches” states, “The 1999 LEMAS reports that virtually all law enforcement agencies in large municipalities met with community groups during the year prior to the survey, as did 78 percent of State law enforcement agencies (Hickman and Reaves, 1999)”. What this shows, is many police officers are interested in their communities and are willing to work with the community, but the community needs to be willing to work with the police departments if they want a positive outcome.
As Sir Robert Peel 's Principles are still in use today, community policing will always be a pivotal factor on how well cities and towns are protected. Community policing will always be a two way team, it cannot always be the police doing all the work or vice versa, community members and police officers have to come together to make their homes a better place to live, and with so many new technologies out today, its hards

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