What Did You Do In The War Grandma Analysis

Superior Essays
During World War 2 women played an important role, both at home and in the Armed Forces. For the first time women were working in the industries of America. As husbands and fathers, sons and brothers shipped out to fight in Europe and the Pacific, millions of women started working in factories, offices, and military bases. Many American women served in uniform, both at home and abroad, volunteering for the Navy Women’s Reserve (WAVES), the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS), the Army Nurses Corps, and other military institutions. Women in uniform not only took office and clerical jobs, but they also served near the front lines, drove trucks, flew military aircrafts, and repaired planes. After reading the interviews to some of the American …show more content…
Katherine O 'Grady, the protagonist of this interview, tells how after the declaration of war she got married and although her husband was not drafted, he volunteer to fight in the war. This story is a clear example of the norm back in war times, women would quickly marry and wait for the husbands while working in war service jobs. Now that women had to work outside their homes they needed to learn how to handle work and the duties at home; in her case she had a child whom had to leave at the nursery for long hours and once at the hospital so she could go to work. In her interview, she also mentioned the shortage of food and how spam became a basic commodity. Horse meat made an attempt to substitute stake, but fortunately it was not successful. The part of her interview that I found more instructive was when she affirms that women’s liberty really started after the war, when things changed because women found out they could do things on their own and still survive. The war clearly made women more aware of their rights and equal capabilities. In addition, going out of their houses to perform industry jobs helped women gain more credibility and to show men that they were equally

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