Role Of Heroism In A Doll's House

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Nora a 19th Century Heroine In 1879 the year A Doll’s House was published by playwright Henrik Ibsen, Norwegian women had few rights in the societal schematics of the era. The question of whether Nora, the main character in A Doll’s House, is a Norwegian feminist heroine or not, is a widely debated subject. “For over a hundred years, Nora has been under direct siege as exhibiting the most perfidious characteristics of her sex; the original outcry of the 1880s is swollen now to a mighty chorus of blame” (Templeton). According to Norwegian history, “it was not until the 1890s that married women gained the right to control their own wealth. Prior to the start of industrialization in the nineteenth century, the role of women was entirely subservient …show more content…
The facts presented will prove that Nora is, in fact, a symbol of feministic heroism. Nora’s adeptness to play into and manipulate societal norms, her strength, and faculty to escape the subjugation ascribed to her as a woman, confirms her status as a feminine heroine of her time. In 1879 Norwegian society women were dominated by, and expected to be submissive to their husband’s as their ascribed status within society. Nora is adept at playing her ascribed role while concurrently manipulating it to serve her needs. Evidence of these dual modes of behavior is readily available from the play text. The first example of this is inferred in the very first scene as Nora arrives home with Christmas purchases. Torvald, utilizing one of his many chauvinistic nicknames, for Nora states, “bought did you say? All these things? Has my little spendthrift been wasting money again? Nora responds… Yes, Torvald, but we can …show more content…
It outlines a story of subjugation between the sexes in a way that for many is still relevant. Although Nora utilized manipulations of and played into societal expectations, her strength of character allowed her to escape from her ascribed status in search of a new life. Everywoman facing similar struggles should be so fortunate as to show the fortitude Nora did. Critics throughout the century have described Nora as narcissistic, selfish and dismissed the wealth of knowledge this story offers. However, the best way to understand the story is to “remove the "woman problem" from A Doll House; let us give Nora Helmer the same rights as Torvald Helmer, and let him consider her his equal. What is left of the play? The only honest response is nothing, for if we emancipate Nora, free her from the Dollhouse, there is no play; or, rather, there is the resolution of the play, the confrontation between husband and wife and the exit that follows, the only crisis and denouement that could properly conclude the action” (Templeton). Without the oppression of the Norwegian woman this story would not exist, and without the oppression of countless women to this day this story would not be

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