Beijing Gender Equality

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According to Bayeh (2016:37), the issue of women empowerment and gender equality is at the top of agendas across the world as gender inequality is widely spread in all cultures. This is clearly demonstrated in the already adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDG Goal 5 on gender equality) and the Africa Agenda 2063, which calls for gender equality and women empowerment. Kenya is not exempt, and as a developing country, gender disparity especially in politics is highly rampant. Having just conducted its general election on August 8, it is clearly visible in the elections outcome that the country was barely able to achieve the 2/3 gender rule. With only 22 women having won constituency seats in the recently concluded general election, the number reduces the higher you go with only three women out of 47 having been voted in as senators and governors .
In September 1995, more than 17,000 participants and 30,000 activists streamed into Beijing for the Fourth World Conference on Women. Freeman (1996) states that “In every country, even the smallest or least developed there is a greater awareness of women, women's problems and women's importance than ever before. And in every country, women's consciousness about themselves has changed” (Freeman, 1996: p.1). The participants were diverse, coming from around the globe with a single purpose in mind: gender equality and
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This has brought changes to the women lives in economic, social and political sectors. More women are now educated compared to 1995, there are laws being enacted in many countries against gender-based violence and many more women are in political and leadership position in the world. The gender gap in economic participation and opportunities for women is reported to have closed by 60 per cent in 2014, up from 56 per cent in 2006 (WEF,

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