Role Congruity Theory In The Workplace

808 Words 4 Pages
Although there are numerous theories through which bias against women in the workplace has been studied, the impact of role congruity theory is perhaps the most pervasive. Role congruity theory suggests that women are discriminated against because ideas of proper feminine gender roles do not mesh with the stereotypes of a leader, with the results being that women in leadership positions are not viewed favorably and the leadership role itself is minimized when women are in charge (Eagly & Karau, 2002). The method through which these biases are perpetrated varies, as does the reasoning behind their occurrence. This paper will explore some of these methods and will help explain how and why they occur in order to raise awareness of the phenomenon …show more content…
Scott and Brown (2006) used a lexical decision task to study automaticity in notions of leadership with a sample of Canadian undergraduates. They hypothesized that from the period of encoding, women are already at a disadvantage in being viewed as effective leaders due to the fact when considering their leadership abilities, the communal stereotype interferes in information processing. This means that they expected participants to have a difficult time matching agentic leadership behavior with women, and communal behavior with men. Utilizing a 2 x 2 within-subjects design, they found partial support for this hypothesis because participants had a harder time recognizing feminine traits after being presented with agentic …show more content…
Niu and Rosenthal (2009) performed a study that measured levels of trust discrimination toward socially dominant and subordinate groups. The researchers put forth two hypotheses in an attempt to examine this, which focused on the five groups they defined as dominant, including whites, males, fluent English speakers, those who had attained higher education, and those with a greater income. For the first hypothesis, it was expected that each of the five socially dominant groups would be trusted more than the subordinate groups. The second hypothesis suggested that the types of groups themselves would affect the level of trust, whereby some groups would be trusted more than others and that trust discrimination would play out in a hierarchical

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