Robert Louis Stevenson Duality Of Human Nature

1200 Words 5 Pages
Robert Louis Stevenson made a lasting effect on society with his style of writing and with the concept that he included in his novel, showing man as a mixture of good and evil. In his day, these ideas were so radical that they helped develop the novel into a classic. They created an impact on society, and his books are even read in schools today. Robert Louis Stevenson was born on November 13, 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was the only child of Thomas and Margaret Stevenson. Although healthy at birth, Robert soon developed breathing problems. These problems developed into tuberculosis, a somewhat fatal disease that attacks the host’s lungs and bones. Due to this, Robert became extremely thin and weak for the rest of his lifetime(Daiches, …show more content…
Because of this, he was able to incorporate many different themes into his novels such as reputation, the duality of man, and reason. The main theme is about the duality of human nature. This is shown by the relationship between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Dr. Jekyll is not fully good. He is a mixture of good and evil, and he chooses to be good because of societal norms. Mr. Hyde, on the other hand, doesn’t have to choose to be evil, because he is fully evil. The theme capitalizes on the mixture of good and evil in man, and what would happen if society were not so demanding of …show more content…
He compares Hyde to the first human, acting on instinct and caring nothing of others. This is intriguing to think about, and has kept the book alive for a century. This novel is still here because it is a way to see both into the past and the present. If humans never evolved, theoretically speaking we would be all evil. This novel has contributed to society by merely existing. A reader has to look but into its pages to disappear into a mysterious world. It is considered a classic because of the ideas it sets out, and the way it makes people feel. Only a few books have been deemed to be classics, in respect to millions of others. This book sets apart and actually stimulates what man is capable of, and this indeed is what makes the novel a

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