Essay On The Bronze Age

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Throughout history, China has been a vast region that has always been very difficult to control. In its earliest periods, the lands were divided and conquered by different lords and rulers. However, this drastically changed as centralized rule became prominent in China with the beginning of the Bronze age (1500B.C.). The power struggle amongst Chinese rulers were fulfilled by warfare; and the bronze age had the perfect conducive environment for this type of militaristic approach. The Shang dynasty (1600-1046 BC) was the first dynasty that both ruled China, and had left sufficient evidence to teach us of its nature. In almost 500 years of its existence, the dynasty had succeeded in securing tremendous territories and important alliances, as well as having made considerable advances in its military, from recruitment, through technology, and strategy. Their exploits on the battlefield have changed the way later generations have perceived warfare.
The bronze age was marked by the end of the Neolithic revolution. The Neolithic revolution made it possible for the Chinese to have a stable supply of food from agriculture and domestication. The main goal of the Chinese people in the Neolithic age was survival; having enough food to sustain themselves and reproduce. However, during the bronze age, the focus of
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Just as the “Book of Changes” stipulated preserving peace and co-existence, so does Sun Tzu push for a peaceful outcome. He is not afraid of war, but is interested in a war with merit, and one that can secure the livelihood of the people. He stipulates five aspects of war: (1) moral law; (2) heaven; (3) earth; (4) commanders; (5) method and discipline. Thus, the moral law is the most important of the five aspects, as it makes “the people and their lord of one

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