Rise Of Greek Civilization Essay

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The earlies Greek civilization evolved over thousands of years ago. Many historians claim that the ancient Greek were the founders of Western civilization but others believe that the Greek civilization was obtain from Africa and Egypt. The rise of the Greek civilization developed in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, near the west coast of Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands. Greece has made a long lasting contribution in our modern architecture, literature, medicine, art and philosophers. The rise of Greek happened because of their geographic location, government, and political system. Also, the decline of Greek happened because of their differences opinions of political, economic and military systems. The Greek civilization started with the Minoans …show more content…
Darius the Great was tired of Greece from conquering his land. So he decided to attack the city of Athens because he thought that Athens was the source of his problems. Athens asked the Sparta’s for help but they couldn’t help them at the time. Athens faced the Persians alone in the battle of Marathon and defeated them. Years later, Darius son “king Xerex” tried a different technique to attack the Athens by then Sparta’s were able to join the Athens to defeat the Persians. At the beginning Sparta’s tried to hold back the Persians army but a traitor guided the Persians to surround the Spartan’s. The Sparta’s kind Leonidas sent his troops away, except 300 Spartan’s that fought to death to delay the Persians. The Battle of Platea was led by the Spartans and that was the end for the Persian War. The Peloponnesian War was a war between Sparta and Athens that lasted almost 30 years. The reason that caused this war was their big differences and jealousy between on another. It all started when Spartans leader invaded Athens. The Athenian leader helped fight the Spartans at the beginning until he died due to a plague. This plague affected the Athens during the war but with their new leader named Demosthenes the Athens did pretty well. The war ended when a truce was made between the Spartans and Athens. The truce only lasted five years when Spartans declared war again. The second part of the war was called the Decelean War. After a really long time of fighting the Spartans defeated the

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