Rhetorical Strategies In Marvels Luke Cage

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Rhetorical Strategies in Marvels “Luke Cage: Episode 1” Crafting the legendary “bulletproof man” was no easy task, the creator of the Netflix special Cheo Hodari Coker and his cast sought to revive the long-awaited return of Marvels first black superhero. Being the first live action TV show for a black superhero in the Marvel Universe, Netflix provided the platform for a resurgence in the interest of such an iconic and vital figure. It is not crazy to assume there was an intrinsic amount of pressure on the producers and cast to live up to fans and critics expectations and feedback. Cocker focuses heavily on the setting of Harlem to help submerge the viewer into the world of Luke Cage; throughout the series premier, iconic musicians and archetypal …show more content…
Cocker also cuts to an angle of a makeshift swear jar in an attempt establish that the Barbershop was also a clean and non-hostile environment. It is particularly interesting how Coker introduces us to Luke at this time; expecting perhaps a man in spandex the producers portray Luke in janitorial garment simply trying to earn an honest living juggling two jobs that both seem dissatisfactory. Early on Coker begins to share with audience a particular set of traumatic experiences that entail Like and his superhero identity. These are portrayed in the scene where Pops and Luke reference the death of Luke’s wife as well as a brief bit of insight on how Luke came to be the bulletproof-man. The way Coker approaches this scene cinematically helps the audience resonate with Like about the hardships of his past. None the less, Luke’s introduction is particularly effective in setting a standard of how the viewer expects the superhero to go about his crusade on corruption throughout the …show more content…
For Luke Cage, this nemesis is excellently portrayed by Coker through his perception of the well-mannered and well-dressed Cottonmouth. To introduce the audience to this corrupt protagonist Coker focuses on the Mecca of Cottonmouth’s criminal empire, Harlem’s Paradise. Despite the images one would conjure up when trying to process a villain’s base, the nightclub is portrayed as a very popular and friendly place in Harlem. Met with an entertained crowd and music from R&B legend Raphael Saadiq, Coker, much like how he portrays Pops Barbershop, provides the audience a very comforting and enjoyable Harlem setting regardless of whether good or evil oversees the establishment. As Coker introduces Cottonmouth the portrayal of his nightclub gives a clear indication to the prowess and complicity of his character; with these traits and what the producers display as a ‘professional’ determination in Cottonmouths attitude the realization of a prominent evildoer quickly echoes through the minds of the

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