Rhetorical Analysis: The Case Against Tipping

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Essay Analysis Tipping has become a daily routine of most people living in America. The essay, “The Case Against Tipping,” by Michael Lewis expresses the idea that tipping is becoming too common and too overused in simple businesses like coffeeshops. Lewis is frustrated with how tipping is now everywhere, and people feel very obligated to tip for thought of being embarrassed or experiencing an awkward situation. Lewis writes this essay to American customers to persuade them to stop tipping when it is unnecessary because it is causing our society to see tipping as something that is almost “required” in a sense. “The Case Against Tipping” is very intriguing and well-written, but it lacks strong support and also a variety of examples throughout …show more content…
Lewis backs up his next point of believing that customers are often guilted or felt obligated to tip, when they may not have wanted to or even needed to, by providing the example of customers who may think that a workers salary is figured by assuming they are provided with tips while working. Although this example may be true to some readers, Lewis does not include any facts to build logos in his essay nor quotes from any resources or people pertaining to his argument. He includes how cabdrivers could be intimidating when expecting a tip and assuming it will be at least fifteen percent. This example again could relate to a variety of readers and therefore builds good pathos, but is not supported with any evidence or factual information to back up his claim. A concrete example which helps Lewis’s argument is the sign he claims to have read in the back of a cab which said, “Tipping is customary” (21). This example could infuriate readers in several different ways. Some readers could agree with Lewis that the sign is absolutely uncalled for and inappropriate, or they could be appalled at how Lewis is portraying cab drivers in general and take offense to his essay. Lewis accuses cab drivers of being “the rudest and most inept service people in America,” (21) which could really offend some readers being cab drivers themselves, relatives of cab drivers, or supporters of tipping …show more content…
Lewis has a strong opinion on tipping and when it should not be done, which is good to an extent. His tone throughout the essay tends to be a bit aggressive and harsh, which could steer some readers in the wrong direction or cause them to ignore Lewis’s opinion. Lewis also does not specify who he is targeting with this essay, and he refers to “we” and “us” throughout the essay, but who is he referring to specifically? The only clear examples Lewis referenced were the coffee shop cashier and cab driver, and he could have added a handful of more examples to better connect with his audience. Lewis focuses a bit too much on cutting down cab drivers when he could be adding more facts on how tipping has changed over the years or why his argument is valid. Lewis has some strong points and relatable examples throughout his essay, but it needs

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