Rhetorical Analysis Of TIME Magazine

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In light of Donald Trump’s shocking rise to political eminence as the newly elected president of the United States, numerous rhetorical artifacts relating to an uncertain and fraught future for American government and politics have inundated mainstream media and news outlets, hailing a resurgence of national interest in federal government through largely dogmatic and peremptory ideological and propagandistic rhetorical texts. The recent controversial “Person of the Year” cover of TIME magazine showcasing a pensive President Donald Trump delineated in melodramatic shadows against a livid, uninspiring backdrop exists as a notable and salient rhetorical artifact within American social and media culture. As such, the magazine cover asserts a persuasive …show more content…
In assuming print and digital media forms, the magazine attempts to target a diverse audience and deploys fairly traditional and universal visual ideographs to produce a rhetorical artifact that, despite its convenient ambiguity, posits a critical and largely unsympathetic evaluation of President Trump. Existing traditionally in physical paper form, TIME magazine’s cover issue declaring Donald Trump the “Person of the Year” caters firstly to an educated and mature audience of individuals likely to purchase and read print material. However, given the invention of the ubiquitous medium of the internet, TIME also accommodates a larger public by offering the option of a digital magazine subscription, thus assuming a relevant media form within a modern context and extending appeal to audiences that are younger and customarily more “tech savvy”. Utilizing a …show more content…
Such ideographs observed in the deliberative manipulation of colors, shadows, and objects function to largely interpellate an audience by extending forth an ideology that “ ‘acts’ or ‘functions’ in such as that it ‘recruits’ subjects” at the pinnacle instant that they realize and participate in a rhetorical situation (Perry 20). Therefore, TIME’s crucial interpellation of an audience is not based in strict persuasion or coercion, but instead in the public’s simple “recognition of the ‘rightness’ of [the] [text] and of one’s identity with its reconfigured subject position” (Perry 24). Explicitly, the deployment of a red and blue color scheme serves to inherently interpellate and identity both democrats and republicans as the fundamental constituents of a mass audience, while the use of text affecting pervasive historic allusion appeals to any American citizen cognizant of the nation’s perturbing past. Additionally, the visual’s purposive scheme of cool highlights and dominating shadows serves to subliminally frame the premise by which a relatively universal audience views and interprets the rhetorical artifact. The addition of the tasteful antique armchair targets a select audience bearing knowledge of

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