Rhetorical Analysis Of Sleeping Beauty By Anne Sexton

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Rhetorical Analysis of Sleeping Beauty Almost everyone is familiar with the story of “Sleeping Beauty”, with a classic ending that prince saved the princess and got married. I would simply believe it’s a happy ending story if I didn’t read another version from Anne Sexton. Her version is so much different due to her unfortunate life, which expressed more on the dark side. Such a story is trying to tell people that a miserable childhood may influence a person a whole life, and it’s nearly irreparable, just like Sexton’s life. Sometimes those miserable memories will give kids a negative effect on growing and cause a sense of fearing the world. Those memories of such experience may exist through one’s lifetime. Just like Sexton’s life experience, …show more content…
This version is not just for kids anymore, but for parents who have kids. Anne Sexton wrote this fairy tale based on her childhood experience, aiming at educating parents not to behave as what her parents have done to her, and giving their kids a wonderful and educational childhood to help them grow healthily.When Sexton describes the life after Briar Rose got married, she presents it as fearful, unhappy, and dispirited. Again, through these words, people can see that how an upset childhood will influence a little girl. Although Briar Rose has a beautiful appearance and a noble family, she is lacking vitality now, like a doll. At this point, Anne Sexton is trying to gain sympathy for the girl. Briar Rose is a poor girl, for she cannot choose her life, for she has to live under the shadow of scary memories. In this connection, parents who read this fairy tale will turn to self-examination about how they treat their children. Did they give their kids a healthy childhood? Did their kids grow with a happy life? The Answer to the question what Sexton wants to tell people by her biography through her poetry is all illustrated in the last part of the poem, “That much I am told. I was abandoned. That much I know. I was forced backward. I was forced forward. I was passed hand to hand” (Sexton 142-147). These lines present an image of a likely abandoned kid. A kid who is like a toy, like an item, who cannot feel love. It …show more content…
In this case, when no one can help you, then it’s time that you be strong and help yourself. Unlike kids, teenagers have more ability to do more things than children. They have their own awareness of what is right, and what is wrong. Such experience does not happen only to children, but teenagers as well. This version of the fairy tale is trying to explore the phenomenon of children abuse, and based on this, trying to inspire people to fight for themselves, too. In the sixth stanza, the author gives an image of Briar Rose’s helplessness and lethargy in her married life. She shows no interests in outside things. The girl seems to be in a daze, “but if you kissed her on the mouth, her eyes would spring open, and she’d call out: Daddy! Daddy! Presto!” (Sexton 136-138). She’s out of prison now. At this point, the kiss from someone indicates a new chance for Sleeping Beauty for the happy ending, which means, the people who are also under such pressure, can make an effort to step out and have a new life. Life is always with hope if you make your decision to catch

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