Rhetorical Analysis Of Slave's Chapter Summary, By John Steinbeck

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SYNTAX: The author switches back and forth between the Joad family and the migrant farmers in general. Quotations are used when the chapter is about the Joads. However, when it is about migrant farmers, Steinbeck does not put quotation marks.This is mostliekly he used these quotes to mean that any farmer in the nation oculd be saying that becasue they all share the same struggle. . It also shows how each migrant farmer was not thought of as an individual person, but rather categoraized.The chapters which focus on the migrant farmers are shorter, in general, than those which are centered on the joads. This is probably because the general parts are used to more broadly and Steinbeck shows more of his views on society during these parts rather …show more content…
In Chapter 9, for example, we hear the frustrations of the farmers forced to sell their belongings through an economic system they don 't understand, strengthened with the repeated comment, "Can 't haul 'em back." Similar to medieval mystery plays that brought biblical stories to life for the understanding of the common people, Steinbeck uses generalized characters and dialogue to illustrate the plight of the dispossessed tenants. The most striking and apparent style used in these intercalary chapters is language and rhythms reminiscent of the syntactical structures of the King James Bible. The spiritual beauty and strength of this language is most clearly seen in the apocalyptic warning delivered in Chapter 25, "There is a crime here which goes beyond denunciation. There is a sorrow here that weeping cannot symbolize. There is a failure here that topples all our success. The fertile earth, the straight tree rows, the sturdy trunks and the ripe fruit. And children dying of pellagra must die because a profit cannot be taken from an …show more content…
The owners and the tenants argue two conflicting views about the land. For the tenants, land is a vital part of their existence. For the landlords, it is only an investment, which yields profits. In the later section of the novel, Steinbeck contrasts the Hoovervilles established on the outskirts of various towns with the vast tracts of land that lie unused in the West. The owners of these estates are fearful that the migrants may march on their property. The theme of people 's relationship to land is a crucial one. Tied to the theme of land ownership, Steinbeck depicts that the individual is increasingly at the mercy of the vast anonymous forces of capitalism which cannot be identified because it is faceless, mindless, and heartless.They are the banks that direct businesses because they possess the money. They are the large landowners who sometimes never see their

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