Rhetorical Analysis Of Nelson Mandela's Speech

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Steps to Freedom Nelson Mandela once said, “There is no easy walk to freedom anywhere, and many of us will have to pass through the valley of the shadow of death again and again until we reach the mountain tops of our desires.” (BrainyQuote) Politically an African nationalist and democratic socialist, Nelson Mandela, in his speech, “I Am Prepared to Die,” justifies the wrongful accusations he faced during his law-breaking years to create a racialism free country. Mandela’s purpose is to protect law-breaking as the unavoidable condition under which bona fide law can recommence its affiance of justice and win back the respectability and humanity of blacks in South Africa. He adopts an affirmative tone in order to show people he broke laws because …show more content…
He appeals to his audiences’ emotions by admitting to his criminal past and also states his dreams for the South African residents by saying, “I hoped then that life might offer me the opportunity to serve my people and make my own humble contribution to their freedom struggle” (Mandela). He uses the rhetorical appeal of pathos by using his own emotions to show his audience the personal struggle he has with the government and his principles to create a non-segregated and peaceful nation. The rhetorical appeal pathos appears later when Mandela expresses, “…violence by the African people had become inevitable, and that unless responsible leadership was given to canalize and control the feelings of our people, there would be outbreaks of terrorism which would produce an intensity of bitterness and hostility between the various races of this country which is not produced even by war” (Mandela). This statement creates an intimidating emotion towards the violence the audience is told about and the consequences of their bearings. He later extends himself to his people and to the audience by announcing that “if there was to be guerrilla warfare, I wanted to be able to stand and fight with my people and to share the hazards of war with them” (Mandela). He allows himself to become one of his people in order to show the audience he is like them and not better than anyone else. This strikes the audiences’ emotions and shows that Mandela is a respectable and dedicated leader who wants good for his

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