Revolutions: The Causes Of The French Revolution

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Revolutions are seen by many as an inevitable part of many societies. They allow both the people and societies to progress and advance. One of these revolutions was the French Revolution, which led to the downfall of monarchies in other parts of Europe. The French Revolution began in 1789 and ended in the late 1790s. The revolution began with people wanting small reforms, such as changes to the system of taxation; leading to a complete change, transforming every aspect of French citizen’s lives, including for a short time, calendars and clocks. The events during the revolution gradually became more and more radical; starting with non-radical things such as the calling of the Estate-General and formation of the National Assembly, then progressing …show more content…
One of these hardships was war. The French fought a war with the British from the 1740s to the 1750s, and fought the Seven Years’ War from 1756 – 1763, (Doyle, 20). France did not do too well in these wars, and ended up losing both Canada and many establishments in India. King Louis XVI also went to war to protect America in 1778 from British forces. The war was paid mostly by new loans, rather than more taxation. France did not gain much from the war since no land was gained, and Americans continued to trade with the British, (Doyle, 20). After the wars, France was left with a huge national debt. Along with the wars, France’s main source of income took a hit. “A month before monarchical authority collapsed into bankruptcy, a colossal hailstorm swept across northern France and destroyed most of the ripening harvest”, (Doyle, 37). Following that, bread prices rose, and people spent more of their money on food. The following winter was unusually cold, which caused many other issues, such as issues with transportation and flooding after everything thawed, (Doyle, 37). People were starving and …show more content…
Calonne, the finance minister at the time, thought of a radical plan to try and help France with its financial crisis. He tried coming up with some new reforms, and used new kinds of economic thinking. One of these new reforms was issuing uniform land taxes that excluded nobody. This made it so that even the nobility would be taxed. Another reform he proposed planned to increase fiscal yield by abolishing internal customs barriers, forcing road labor, and imposing control over grain trade (Doyle, 34). These reforms failed, and caused a political crisis. The Third Estate was not too happy about the forced road labor, and the control over grain trade, and the nobility was completely against paying taxes. France’s economy still needed help, and was continuing to crumble

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