Reverend Hale Character Analysis

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Reverend John Hale is a young, smart man close to being in his forties. His main purpose in Arthur Millers’s play, The Crucible, is to try to help and save Salem and its witch trials. Rather than witchcraft, Hale quickly realizes that the only true evil in the town is its people. With the help of God and the prayers towards him, the Minister, Reverend Hale, believes he can achieve anything Salem throws at him. Mr. Hale truly wants to help the town and has no bad intentions of harming it what so ever, even though it may seem like it because of how highly he thinks of himself. Mr. Hale can be a snob, but is overall respected by everyone. He believes in himself and thinks he knows and can fix any problems given to him. Hale does a lot of questioning …show more content…
Danforth asks if Mr. Hale is scared of being questioned and interrogated with questions causing all the attention to be on him. Hale comes back with a remark, saying he is only scared of the Lord, but there is fear in the country (98). Hale admits he is scared and fears the court, which is different from his optimistic attitude towards the beginning of the play. He is now a confused and frustrated man. Hale stands up for Procter arguing even though he does not know him personally, Procter should receive the same love and kindness in Salem that God would give him in heaven. He deserves to be listened to before any sort of death sentence is made. Hale feels very strongly about his beliefs and he decides to share them with Danforth: “I am a minister of the Lord, and I dare not take a life without there be proof so immaculate no slightest qualm of conscience may doubt it” (99). He is asserting that Procter needs to have the chance to defend himself, just as they would want if they were put in the same situation with their life on the line. Danforth is not fond of Hale and his attitude towards the court and Salem, “Mr. Hale, believe me; for a man of such terrible learning you are most bewildered… I should be confounded were I called upon to defend these people” (100). Danforth then asks Reverend Hale if he doubts his probity and Hale quickly out of fear, says he does not, which is most …show more content…
Reverend Hale comes into Salem with the genuine intention of helping the town. He does not have any bad intentions, but he is extremely cocky and has confidence that he can fix the “witchcraft” problem. Hale is a minister and does a lot of questioning to get to the bottom of things. He despises of the devil and surly loves God. He definitely wants what is best for the town. If anyone confess’ witchcraft to him, he plans on helping them by the word of God, not by just giving up and putting them to death. Reverend Hale brings up a good argument stating the devil goes for the innocent, loving people to prove power. Hale believes that anyone can be saved by the power of God and he wants to use all the tools he has been given to help Salem in its time of need. Throughout The Crucible, the readers are just as new to the situation with witchcraft in Salem than Hale is. The audience grows with Hale and understands why he looses confidence from the beginning of the play to the end. Hale is a dynamic character because he changes from hopeful, to weary, to being in doubt about everything he initially plans. The audience connects with Hale because, as both are newcomers to Salem, the townspeople and costs true colors reveals the true intentions of accusing the disliked

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