Revelations Of Divine Love Analysis

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Julian of Norwich, in her Revelations of Divine Love, synthesizes the asceticism which had permeated the Roman Catholic Church from its earliest history with the philosophical advancements made by Saint Thomas Aquinas only one hundred and fifty years before her. She does this seamlessly and almost certainly unintentionally, demonstrating that the philosophical developments of Saint Thomas Aquinas were familiar concepts to her such that they shaped her mystic religious view. Despite the familiarity and influence of Saint Thomas Aquinas, philosophy was clearly not the object of this composition; instead, Julian focuses on her idea of the love of God as she has been made aware of it through her visions. She casts the light of these personal, private revelations of God’s love onto the asceticism and philosophy which were commonplace throughout the Roman Catholic Church in the …show more content…
The beatific vision as described by Thomas is one of the primary borrowings which Julian commits. The doctrine of the beatific vision states that heaven is nothing else than the full knowledge and experience of God. Julian makes use of this as she describes God as pure bliss and perfect rest, as well as when she states that after death, we will understand the mysteries of God which are hidden from us in this life. In addition to the beatific vision, Julian explicitly states the double nature of Christ and the idea that one should not take only a piece of the contents of something and leave the rest. Both of these concepts were philosophically expounded by Saint Thomas Aquinas and used by Julian, who seems to have possessed the ideas as part of her religious schema. This indicates that Julian learned of Thomistic philosophy, or at least some of its content, at an early enough age to incorporate it organically into her own mystic

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