Return To Work Case Study

2312 Words 10 Pages
The weekly monitored return to work plan was eight weeks in length. Patariki was to start with two weeks of the functional strengthening programme three times weekly. The goals by the end of six weeks were to increase his quadriceps muscle strength, increase his physical activity, increase his dynamic balance to be safe walking on uneven ground, reinforce pain education, and improve technique and strength with climbing up/down steps. Week three he would introduce graduated hours of work alongside the programme. Tasks over week three included up to two hours early morning of shadowing his son, being a passenger on the bike to bring the cows in, and an extra in the shed for milking. Week four and five increased to four hours daily with both …show more content…
Evidence supports that a person’s own expectations regarding their eventual return to work or recovery is the single most powerful predictor factor for actual return to work (Paquette, 2008). As evidence suggests, targeting yellow flags can lead to more consistently positive results than either ignoring them or providing compilation interventions to people regardless of psychological risk factors (Nicholas et al, 2011). Identifying if Patariki’s self-efficacy and psychosocial factors were improving with the interventions would assist in the future direction and any required adaptations of the …show more content…
Persistent pain is the complex problem of pain lasting longer than three months and is no longer associated with tissue damage. Historically treatments for persistent pain included avoiding activity. The response to new understandings of pain science was that treatments now point to increasing activity in a graded manner to retrain the brain and its pain responses. (Butler & Moseley, 2013). Patariki’s beliefs are required to be directly challenged with weekly education sessions using the tools of; education and understanding, training the brain through pacing and graded exposure to activity; managing perceived threat, and the integration of new contexts for movement (Butler & Moseley, 2013). The real value of adopting this intervention for re-integration into the workplace is that if absent, the injured worker can be unsure of diagnosis and prognosis, fearing re-injury and possibly catastrophizing the injury which in turn may threaten the return to work success (Sullivan 2005; Accident Compensation Corporation 2004; Nicholas 2011). Adoption of the new pain science is being seen with the development of the new pain contracts through Accident Compensation Corporation. This direction will be to interesting in its future impact on the development of Providers knowledge of pain interventions for

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