Restraint-Free Case Study

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Companies who chose to be restraint-free actually are putting a higher risk of danger to their patients. They do this by leaning on chemical restraints with high numbers of death related to them. Their risk is not only affecting patient in the sense of chemical restraints but by attempting to use alternative that do not work, such as placing someone at the nursing station to be watched over applying a lap belt. Restraint-free companies also raise mental distress to the patient’s family and may even put them at risk. Imagine walking into a facility to visit a parent, who is sitting at the nursing station most of the day with nothing to do but watch people pass by. The first reaction is going to be to take them to their room. Once in the room …show more content…
All these items can cause a patient distress and raise risk for showing aggressive behavior. In a comparative study done by Jason Matejkowski PhD who has gained his PhD from University of Pennsylvania in quantitative social research, Sungkyu Lee MSW with the University of Pennsylvania and Woojae Han, who is a graduate assistant specializing in community mental health look at “The association between Criminal history and mental health service use among people with serious mental illness.” The authors found that their sample of over 400 patient with a mental health disorder ranging from bipolar to schizophrenia had roughly 30 percent with a criminal background. Based off of their sample size of patients who are cognitively aware but do have a mental disorder 120 roughly had a criminal record. The likelihood of a patient who has criminal record in the hospital or nursing facility is high based off this data and being placed into a stressful, emotional and sometimes painful environment makes it tough to not react in an aggressive …show more content…
Restraints can be found in many levels of medical and outside of medical because of their proven effectiveness in keep a patient safe. Authors Ann Minnick et al decided to focuses on numbers of restraint used outside of the following fields of psychiatric, emergency, and long-term care. Ann Minnick PhD Rn FAAN is the senior Associate Dean for Research at Vanderbilt University school of Nursing. They find that 5.8 percent of all restrained used were in another field outside of the ones not looked at. They also found that of that 5.8 percent a large piece of that was neurology using the physical restraints. When looking into the use of physical restraints in prison we must take account the level of aggression in a prison. Which could be higher than a long-term care home, requiring physical restraint in times of emergencies. Prisons who use physical restraint are subject to the same laws as the medical field, in that restraints can only be used as a last option, with the least restrictive measure being applied. In a court case one prison tried to expand the use of physical restraints to cover a broader range of reason they may be applied. Elyn R. Saks who is the author of Refusing Care: Forced Treatment and the rights of the mentally Ill along with the Associate Dean and Professor of Law

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