Residential Segregation Case Study

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Economist Leah Boustan (2013) wrote" Residential segregation defined as the separation of racial groups in urban space." Especially, in the United States, there is a gruesome history with residential segregation and racial discrimination. The racial discrimination in U.S. went as far as redlining African-Americans, denying them financial services, specifically home loans for decades to keep them from moving into certain residents. That is just one form of discrimination that was efficient at segregating citizens. Up until 1954 it was allowed and encourage to have segregated schools, and that does not necessarily mean that schools and states across the nation followed the Supreme Court ruling of Brown V. Board. Besides, school districts are based on an individual's residents, but because of segregation laws, black people had to travel miles just to find a school that was for them. Because the federal government is responsible for …show more content…
One has greater resources and sometimes even a surplus, while the other operates off of limited resources and outdated equipment that contributes to inefficiencies. The landmark case Brown V. Board of Education definitively prove that "separate but equal" was a falsehood. African-Americans were barred from getting a quality education, and white people had unfettered access to quality education. When schools end integration to battle segregation, it is found that education inequalities widen. Billing et al.(2012) States in their analysis that "We find that the resegregation of [CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG] schools led to an increase in racial inequality. Both whites and minorities score lower on high school exams when they are assigned to schools with more minority students. Are goal is better our society not to leave it at risk of failure. It makes sense to actively counter segregation that hurts our communities which damage our progression to full

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