Residential School Essay

2302 Words 10 Pages
The Residential School era was a dark time in Canadian as well as Indigenous history and is a topic that is still “swept under the rug” today. During this gloomy time Indigenous children were forcible taken from their communities and sent to Residential Schools in efforts to “civilize” Canadian society (Zalcman, 2016, pg.76). In these horrific efforts to cultivate Canada, children were made to look like an “average” Canadian. Their hair was cut to how the Government saw fit and they were given uniforms to wear. Children were not allowed to speak in their native languages or show their native culture in anyway, if the children were to disobey these rules they were abused and tortured (Zalcman, 2016, pg. 79). These unfortunate children had …show more content…
Post-traumatic stress disorder is defined as a psychiatric disorder that can occur following the experience or witnessing of a life-threatening event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault in adult or childhood (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, n.d). After learning what the meaning of post-traumatic stress disorder it is apparent how this disorder can be prevalent in the lives of Residential School survivors. This time of their life was so intense that it would be difficult to ever forgot. It is proven that 65% of these survivors suffer with post-traumatic stress disorders due to their abuse and neglect in Residential Schools (Ross et all, 2015, pg.185). The points stated above prove that Residential Schools greatly affected the lives of the survivors in a damaging …show more content…
These two forms of parenting go from one extreme to the next, and neither can be good for a child. A child’s environment in their early years greatly affects the rest of their life, if a parent is too overprotective it can cause the child to live a life full of fear as they were never allowed to explore the world for themselves. If a parents form a discipline is too harsh, and they use the techniques that were used on them, it can result in developmental issues for the child and force them to shut down emotionally. Both of these instances, can cause children of survivors to repeat the cycle when they have children of their own and can even go as far as Child Services removing these at-risk children from their parents (Morrissette, 1994,

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