Sojourner Truth Abolition

1604 Words 7 Pages
Through a shift in the United States Democracy in the 1800’s, the idea of slavery was transformed. Although the idea for freedom had always been a major focal point for all slaves, the actuality of making it legal was a new determination. For an African American woman like Sojourner Truth, a former slave, becoming an active participant in this fight for abolition was her life goal. As religious reform and anti-slavery feminism movements began in the 1840’s, so did Truth’s career as being one of the most influential African American women of the 19th century. Sojourner Truth vigorously affected the women’s rights and abolition movements through her affluent preachings while traveling and her bold stature as a self-made abolitionist/women’s activist, …show more content…
Those at the Ohio Convention of 1851 refused to allow Truth to speak at the event because of her lack of education and fight for abolition. Many were against allowing Truth to speak on behalf of abolition because that meant that the parliamentary rules of the Convention would be violated, as it would rebuke many of the anti-feminists and anti-abolitionists of the time (Washington). However, once she spoke she was able to earn “the gratitude of the women by silencing the taunting men” (Terry 429). Her speech was mainly about her being a woman and not being treated fairly as a women due to the color of her skin (Truth). In one aspect of her speech, Truth addressed the idea of intellect through the analogy of one cup only being able to hold pint and another cup being able to hold a quart to symbolize that some people may have more than others intellectually or physically. However, a quantity should not degrade them from getting theirs a “little half-measure full” or in other words, using their full potential …show more content…
Some of America’s greatest amendments emerged that were impressively influenced by many activists and abolitionists, like Sojourner Truth. The thirteenth amendment, which was ratified in 1865, during Truth’s lifetime, abolished slavery and involuntary servitude (“Constitutional Amendments”). Through Truth’s passionate preachings she gained respect and support as an abolitionist, and her efforts led to a new era of freedom in America (Truth). The fourteenth amendment, which was ratified in 1868, again during Truth’s lifetime, forbade states to to restrict citizens from basic rights and granted equal rights to all former slaves (“Constitutional Amendments”). Truth was in full support of gaining freedom and equal rights for all slaves, especially women. The nineteenth amendment also, guaranteed all genders, men and women the equal right to vote. Although this amendment was ratified in 1940, nearly four decades after Truth died, it did finally emerged due to her efforts as an assertive women’s activist and strong supporter of the Women’s Suffrage Movement (“Constitutional Amendments”). These amendments were all established at different aspects of Truth’s career but were pivotal in changing her life long journey into a successful

Related Documents