Repressing Mr Hyde Analysis

Decent Essays
Repressing Mr. Hyde: The Dissociation of Dr. Henry Jekyll
An Annotated Bibliography
Barry, Peter. "Psychoanalytic criticism." Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1995. 92-115. Print.
Barry’s book discusses the major literary criticisms and theories within them. Within this particular chapter, Barry focuses on Freud’s work on the unconscious and its influence on the actions of individuals. Barry draws concentrate on repression and the idea that this “forgetting” of conflicts contributes to desires ultimately being “forced” out. This source is especially important as it blatantly expresses the phenomenon that occurs with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
Davis, Colin. "From Psychopathology To Diabolical
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He regards most dreams as unconscious desires for sex, usually a repressed sexual desire. Freud insists that while not all desires surround sex, dreamers cannot rule out the possibility of sexual desires as the cause as many of the symbols he uncovers often expose sex as the culprit. While this seems to stray from the topic of repression, it actually may be on the right path to discovering the reason behind Dr. Jekyll’s reason for needing Mr. Hyde in his life.
Stiles, Anne. “Robert Louis Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde and the Double Brain.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900. 46.4 (Autumn 2006): 879-900. ProQuest. Web. 24 Jan. 2016.
Stiles’ article discusses Stevenson 's inspiration for his novella back to “Félida X” and “Sergeant F,” French case studies of split personality. These instances are credited to “bilateral brain hemisphere asymmetry,” meaning the brain is not split evenly. Stiles’ knowledge of these studies and Stevenson’s novella help to enhance his contemporary thoughts on the Gothic story. This article will be used to explore the biological aspects of Dr. Jekyll’s behavior.
"A History of Dissociative Identity Disorder." Demonic Possession and Psychiatry. Fortea, 2 Sept. 2015. Web. 10 Jan.
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The case of Sybil Dorsett is specifically mentioned to enforce the influence of repression on DID. Dorsett’s psychiatrist struggled to prove the validity of Sybil’s case, but now hers is the guiding case for dissociated and repressed clients. Using Dorsett’s case as a guide, perhaps Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde will reveal more about repression and dissociation.
Sanna, Antonio. "Silent Homosexuality in Oscar Wilde 's Teleny and the Picture of Dorian Gray and Robert Louis Stevenson 's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." Law and Literature 24.1 (2012): 21, 39, 111-112. ProQuest. Web. 24 Jan. 2016.
Sanna’s article discusses the possibily that Dr. Jekyll’s repressed sexual desire is homosexuality. During a time when heterosexuality was the only acceptable orientation, many homosexuals repressed their desires. This is a plausible theory for Dr. Jekyll as he has an almost erratic fear of being exposed. Fearing scandal and scrutiny, Dr. Jeykll becomes a recluse to avoid exposing his secret life. Sanna’s article will help to uncover latent homosexual cues within Stevenson’s writing.
Singh, Shubh M., and Subho Chakrabarti. “A Study in Dualism: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Indian Journal of Psychiatry 50.3 (2008): 221–223. PMC. Web. 10 Jan.

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