Representations Of Malvolio In Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

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Act two, scene five of Shakespeare's comedic play, Twelfth Night, demonstrates how the insidious Maria, Sir Toby and Sir Andrew execute their brilliant plan to fool and deceive Malvolio. The 1996 Hollywood film and the Globe theatre’s performance were both unprecedented and unique reenactments of the scene that are greatly venerable. Each of the representations can be prominent because of the variety of their actors, specifically Malvolio. Both of the versions had different intakes on the appearance of Malvolio as well as his eccentricities and mannerisms. The 1996 Hollywood version demonstrated a more old-fashioned version of the scene and of the entire film. This was validated by their actor playing Malvolio, Nigel Hawthorne. Malvolio is …show more content…
He then adjusts his toupee which indicates that he thinks highly of himself. As Malvolio strolls around the garden dreaming of being royalty and Count Malvolio, he notices a white envelope on the ground and out of curiousity, picks it up. At first he doesn’t think much of it and quickly dismisses it but, shortly after, the actor abruptly stops pacing and decides to read the letter. Malvolio reaches for his spectacles in his pocket and reads the letter in a whisper to add emphasis to the tension of the scene. As he continues reading the letter and begins realizing that it is about him he becomes more passionate when reading out loud. The actor then begins addressing the statue as he finishes the letter, and embraces it with passion. Malvolio shouts, “My lady loves me!” and kisses the letter. The actor promises himself that he will smile and attempts to using every twitching muscle in his face which was a good representation of his struggle. In happiness, Malvolio exits the scene while leaping and galloping in pleasure. Nigel Hawthorne expressed Malvolio’s character in quite a quaint demeanor by smelling the envelop that supposedly Olivia gave to him, grasping the statue and galloping away at the …show more content…
Therefore, it was performed in front of a live audience. The Globe version displayed a more comedic interpretation of the scene and of the entire play. This was reflected by their actor playing Malvolio, Stephen Fry who seems to be slightly younger than Nigel Hawthorne, creating a better match for the character. His costume for Malvolio consists of a beard, hair slicked back, a ruff, a shirt with matching loose pants and black stockings to create a medieval style, corresponding with Shakespeare’s time. He enters the stage talking to himself and the audience about his dreams of marrying Olivia and become nobility. He paces back and forth continuously talking until he finds the envelop as he sits down on the bench. Malvolio often hears noises and voices in the bush behind him, which we know are Sir Andrew, Sir Toby and Fabian, causing him to look backwards frequently. As he begins reading the letter the actor displays confusion as he tries to figure out who the letter is addressed to. In confusion he pats his face, deep in thought. Once he realizes that the letter is his, he screams, Malvolio” and jumps up in pride. The actor then begins pacing back and forth and interacts with the audience by them and himself what he will do once he becomes Olivia’s husband and Count Malvolio. He challenges himself to smile, causing the audience to laugh hysterically, as he walks off stage

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